XBox 360 Universe

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  • scissors
    August 24th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    Publisher All In! Games and developer One More Level have released a gameplay trailer for the upcoming first-person cyberpunk action game, Ghostrunner.

    View it below:

    Here is an overview of the game:

    Dive into an intense cyberpunk world and experience fierce, dynamic combat!

    Climb a great tower-city, humanity’s last remaining shelter. Slay your enemies as your blade slices through trouble while delivering bone-crushing one-hit kills. Bullet-time mechanics give you an edge in fast combat. Fight both in the physical world and in cyberspace as you run across walls and slow down time. As you advance up the tower, secrets are revealed. When you realize that you’re being hunted for the tech under your skin, the clock starts ticking on a race to uncover the mystery behind the structure. Solve the riddle or be killed—there is no other option.

    The NVIDIA GeForce RTX platform fuses the AI capabilities, next-gen programmable shaders and real-time ray tracing to let you experience games in a completely new way.

    Ghostrunner will launch for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One and Windows PC in 2020. 

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440099/ghostrunner-gets-gamescom-2019-gameplay-trailer/

  • scissors
    August 24th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    Atlus has released a new character trailer for Persona 5 Royal that introduces Takuto Maruki.

    View it below:

    Persona 5 Royal will launch for the PlayStation 4 in Japan on October 31 and in North America and Europe in 20.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440098/persona-5-royal-trailer-introduces-takuto-maruki/

  • scissors
    August 24th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    Publisher NIS America has released a new trailer for The Alliance Alive HD Remastered. The trailer focuses on the combat system.

    View it below:

    Here is an overview of the game:

    An age of darkness has befallen the world. The Dark Current, a cataclysmic event caused by the Daemons’ emergence, has decimated the population and divided land into separate regions, leaving the survivors to be subjugated by Daemonic overlords. To reclaim their home and free their people, an unlikely fellowship of heroes will band together to spark a fiery revolution. Explore various realms, gain new skills in the heat of battle, and form alliances to stand against the Daemons!

    Key Features:

    • A Vivid World – Explore numerous themed realms using ships, animal mounts, and flying machines.
    • Forged in Battle – Ignite your determination to execute critical attacks and “awaken” new skills for your characters mid-battle.
    • Stand Together – Form alliances with various Guilds to bolster your strength, while gaining access to new vehicles, areas, magic, and more.

    The Alliance Alive HD Remastered will launch for the Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4 and Windows PC in North America on October 8, in October 10 in Japan in Europe on October 11, and in Oceania on October 18. 

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440097/the-alliance-alive-hd-remastered-gets-combat-system-trailer/

  • scissors
    August 24th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    The idea of an entire genre going extinct has floated about the video game industry for decades, with people having historically been very quick to declare a specific genre dead once its glory days are in the past. The most notable genre that suffered from this particular perception among a lot of people was the adventure game. From around the late-1980s to the late-90s adventure games were among the biggest selling releases, especially on PC. 

    Things began to change around the turn of the millennium - with the popularity of shooters and actions games rising higher and higher, adventure games with their generally slower-paced, story-focused style began to decline. Yet, to say that adventure games were ever dead is at best misguided. The genre never truly went away, and even at its lowest point it actually remained relatively popular in Europe. An excellent example of this are the two games we're talking about today – Syberia and Syberia II.

     

    Syberia – Clockwork Automatons

    The golden age of adventure games is generally placed somewhere between 1985 and 1995, depending on who you ask and what your personal favourites are. 1998's Grim Fandango and its commercial failure is often regarded as the final nail in the coffin for both adventure games as a lucrative mainstream genre and the catalyst for LucasArts' decision to end adventure game development for good, with one notable exception in Escape from Monkey Island.

    Just as LucasArts was shifting its focus away from the genre, various studios around the world were doing the exact opposite. Funcom would release The Longest Journey in 1999 to critical and commercial success, and around the same time work began on an adventure game that would eventually expand into an entire trilogy. This was, of course, Syberia.

    Conceived, written, and directed by Benoît Sokal, Syberia is a graphical adventure game with art nouveau and clockpunk elements that heavily influence both the story and the visual style that permeates the vast majority of the gorgeously designed locations found throughout your journey. This can be seen especially well in the various automatons the player encounters around the game's world, each of which are memorable in their own way.

    The game follows the story of Kate Walker, an American attorney, as she journeys across eastern Europe and Russia in order to complete what was initially seen as a simple sale of an automaton toy factory. However, once it turns out that the owner of said factory, Anna Voralberg, has suddenly passed away and that her brother who was previously thought to be dead is actually alive, Kate must set out on a journey to find the missing brother and finish her suddenly much more complicated assignment.

    In regards to gameplay, Syberia is a very traditional graphic adventure game. It focuses heavily on puzzle solving using items and the environment as both sources for and solutions to them. In order for the players to make progress in the story and move to the next location they must complete a number of specific requirements in the one they are currently in. It's pretty much exactly what you would expect from this type of adventure, as more often than not adventure games lived and died by the quality of their puzzles.

    Syberia was originally released on January 9th 2002 in Europe, and over the next few years became something of a sleeper hit, selling over 500,000 copies by late 2005 - an impressive number for an adventure game at the time. The curious part is that Syberia has never really stopped selling, with the series reaching 3 million copies sold before Syberia III was released in 2017. The first two games were very well received upon release, but the third was seen as a near universal disappointment.

     

    Why Was Syberia Forgotten?

    Generally speaking, adventure games made after the genre's so-called golden age could at most hope to achieve a status as cult classics, and Syberia quite quickly found itself in that position. This was despite it achieving a very respectable level of commercial success at launch. Unfortunately, adventure games weren't exactly part of the main stream in the early 2000s, and outside of dedicated adventure game fans Syberia was never going to reach a wide audience.

    In some ways the sales numbers are somewhat misleading. While it is unquestionably impressive for an adventure game series to reach 3 million copies sold these days, that number was achieved over a period of 14 years. That certainly speaks for a consistency the likes of which few other games or series could reach, but it still unfortunately doesn't make the games anything beyond cult favourites.

    The success of the games also seemed to be largely limited to Europe, selling in excess of hundreds of thousands of copies within a few years and continuing to sell for years to come, whereas in North America sales seemed to plateau after a while. As a result the PS2 versions of Syberia and Syberia II were never released in North America, despite the fact that both ports were finished and released in Europe.

    Another aspect that likely had a significant impact on Syberia's lack of long-term recognition was the fact that after the release of the second game in 2004, the series effectively died off for 13 years, so whatever momentum it had managed to build up with the first two titles ultimately went absolutely nowhere. The franchise was left to slowly fade into obscurity.

    The general negative perception towards adventure games by most publishers meant that very few were interested in funding further releases. This, coupled with Benoît Sokal moving on to different projects with a different developer once he realized there was likely not going to be a third Syberia game, meant that even the people who would have been interested in further releases likely just gave up on the series after a while.

     

    Why Should Syberia Be Remembered? 

    Syberia (and its first sequel, Syberia II) is among the very best adventure games made over the last 20 years. The story sets up an intriguing mystery surrounding the Voralberg family history, and then for the duration of the next two games continues to build it up through well-written character interactions, masterful environmental storytelling, and great use of music. The makers of Syberia also understood how to keep the players invested by consistently revealing new details about the central mystery, while still keeping just enough of it hidden to ensure they would keep playing after every reveal.

    Together with some of the most strikingly beautiful and haunting visuals, especially when it came to the game's gorgeous backgrounds, and the often understated but fitting score, the narrative successfully created an atmosphere unlike practically every other game out there at the time. There is a sense of sorrow and longing to Kate's journey across old villages, abandoned factories, once thriving holiday resorts, and many other places.

     

    Often just by letting the game sit still in one place you get a feel for the history of that location, of its past greatness and grandeur that has since slowly diminished and withered away as the years have passed by and people have either left or died. Despite many moments and scenes of levity interspersed throughout, the first two Syberia games are permeated by a sense of melancholy. Even in its most uplifting moments of success and discovery, the world itself seems so steeped in sadness and longing that it affects everything around it.

    On top of everything the two games feature some exceptional vocal performances from the cast, especially from Sharon Mann as Kate Walker. She anchors the entire game and its story, both as a performance and as a character. Without such a great character at its center, or Mann's excellent performance bringing her to life, Syberia would not have been such a memorable game.

    Ultimately, Syberia and its first sequel are heavily story-focused and fairly slow-paced games that take their time weaving their narratives, often letting the player discover the world's secrets on their own rather than holding their hands, leading them from one place to the next. They are games that require patience and thinking, but they are also immensely rewarding titles that don't treat the player like an idiot.

    If you're a fan of adventure games, or just well-written titles in general, you should give Syberia and Syberia II a try. They came out at a time when most people had written the entire genre off as either dying or already dead, and as a result many missed them altogether. However, that is very easy to fix, as both games (as well as Syberia III) are still cheaply available on marketplaces like Steam and GoG. I bought the first two games during a sale years ago for around five euros combined.

    Also, the fourth game in the series was announced literally as I was in the middle of writing this article, so now is a very good time to jump into the world of Syberia and experience its excellent story for yourself.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440095/forgotten-gems-10-syberia-amp-syberia-ii/

  • scissors
    August 23rd, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    What started with Demon's Souls in 2009 continues to this day with games like Nioh, Sekiro, The Surge, and many more with no signs of slowing down. The latest is Remnant: From the Ashes from Gunfire Games - the studio best known for titles like Chronos and Darksiders III. Although these titles have not placed Gunfire Games at the fore of gamers' minds, Remnant will help change that. With its more accessible mechanics, terrific presentation, superb mesh of genres, and randomly generated worlds, Remnant is a pleasant surprise and proves that Gunfire Games is a developer to watch moving forward.

    Remnant's story takes place in the same universe as Chronos. Fortunately, you won't have to play Chronos to enjoy the narrative. After you create your character with a basic editor, you end up washed ashore on an island with a mysterious tower. As you make your way through the island, which acts as a tutorial, you are ambushed by tree-like creatures and are saved by a group of people from a place called Ward 13. Once there, you quickly learn the denizens are seemingly the last remnants of humanity in a post-apocalyptic world, hunted to near extinction by the tree-like species, The Root, who have invaded from another world. Essentially, your larger mission is to find Ford - the former leader of Ward 13 who has recently gone missing - and figure out a way to defeat The Root.


    Clearly, the story is pretty basic, but the lore is surprisingly deep. Even if you're unfamiliar with Chronos, spending time to read bits of information from computer terminals, diaries, and conversing with different characters will help you appreciate the universe Gunfire Games has crafted and unravel the mystery of The Root further. Exploring also helps with unique loot. Characters you meet will primarily be regulated to Ward 13 and generally act as vendors. You have dialogue options with a few of them, but they don’t play too big a role in the events.

    The story takes a backseat to the gameplay itself though, and here is where Gunfire Games really shines. Remnant is a third-person action RPG shooter that’s clearly influenced by the Souls games among others. Like Souls, there's an endurance meter you need to manage along with punishing gameplay. Normal mode is easier than similar games, so if you're a Souls veteran, Hard or even Nightmare is probably more suitable.

    Elements that make Remnant more accessible include the fact that you don't lose anything when you die. Save points - World Stones and World Shards here - are also more abundant and can be found at the start of every area. Both World Stones and Shards allow you to fully heal, restock ammo, replenish Dragon Hearts - which you use to heal or revive team members - as well as allow you to teleport back to Ward 13. World Stones further allow you to teleport to other World Stones. The areas are also straightforward, with a map that you can pull up, making it impossible to get lost. Battles are also primarily with your firearms, making it harder for enemies to get at you. These changes certainly make things more digestible and dying less frustrating, but the challenge is still there.


    Early on in Remnant, enemies are pretty simple but can overwhelm you if you're not careful. As new varieties are introduced, you really have to adapt and approach enemies more tactically. For instance, in the swamps of Corsus, you’ll have to deal with some enemies charging at you from the surface while others dig under the swamps to get at you. In the temples of Yaesha, you might find the undead slowly ambling towards you joined by several faster ones that blink at you. The variety and amount of enemies ensure battles are often dynamic, chaotic, and unpredictable especially with a full group of three players, as the challenges scale automatically.

    The difficulty is even more pronounced with the vicious bosses. Often, these encounters are a real treat to play as constant defeat by the same boss leads to gritty determination, while finally defeating them results in immense exhilaration. These highs and lows mirror those of the Souls games well. A boss of note is Ixillis, a giant flying insect with a scythe, who you battle on a narrow bridge. Dodging, timing your attacks, and being mindful of your environment all come into play even before a second Ixillis is summoned to join the fray. The final boss is also a highlight, as you struggle in an epic, multi-stage battle during the climax. Quite a few of the bosses do spawn a lot of minions that come after you though. This makes things extremely frustrating as you have to deal with a lot on screen at once.

    Fortunately, Gunfire Games makes sure you have every opportunity to be prepared against your adversaries with weaponry, abilities, and traits as part of your arsenal. There aren't a terrible amount of guns in Remnant, but each plays differently and is extremely satisfying, feeling weighty and powerful when you fire them. Guns are simply divided into Long Guns or Hand Guns. Melee weapons are also here but clearly they're not the focus. There’s also armour which is worn on your head, chest, and legs and provide the usual defensive stats. You can find armour sets hidden that give further bonuses. Equipment can be bought, crafted, and upgraded with materials you find as loot back in Ward 13. Most guns play as you might expect; the sniper rifle is excellent at range and exploiting weak spots, while the shotgun decimates enemies up close.


    Weapons can be augmented with a Mod, which provide unique offensive or defensive abilities to further give you an edge or get you out of a bind. These Mods are charged as you deal damage and give you more ways to approach challenges. Rattle Weed, for example, shoots out a plant that diverts enemies away from you, forcing them to attack it instead. This gives you time to reload, regroup, and reposition as needed. Beckon is another very useful Mod that summons flying skulls that attack your enemies. Mods add another layer of strategy and it's fun experimenting with them to help on your quest.

    To further supplement you, there’s a progression system with Traits. As you play, you’ll unlock trait points which provide certain stat boosts. There are only three initially, but as you play, more become available. These Traits allow you to further customize your character to suit your own playstyle. It’s straightforward and works really well albeit simplified compared to RPG systems in some other games.

    Because the worlds are randomly generated, you won't be able to craft every weapon, mod, and armour in one playthrough, as you won't fight every boss and see every scenario. Remnant is a game that has a ton of replayability and no playthrough is going to be the same. This keeps things unpredictable and really does make you want to explore. However, the randomization does make it so that some parts are a bit too easy while others are too difficult. Gunfire Games addresses this by scaling the difficulty based on your equipment levels, but it's not perfect. On top of all this, you can reroll your campaign at anytime at your World Crystal in Ward 13 and face different challenges. To help see other bosses, you can easily join other games with friends or strangers as well.


    Hopping into another's game seamlessly is another key strength for Remnant. When you join a game you continue on the campaign where the host is but keep your own items. Loot is automatically shared amongst your party. It’s all streamlined to keep you in the action and you’ll have to be, because the difficulty ramps up by itself as well. However, playing together is more rewarding and enjoyable. There are even secrets that are only accessible with more party members. Some issues do show up in multiplayer though. Despite being a cooperative shooter, there is no way to communicate via voice or text in-game. There aren’t even any sort of emotes to use either. This makes it difficult to plan out strategies together, particularly for boss fights.

    Although the main attraction for Remnant is to cooperatively shoot and overcome your enemies, it is supported by strong presentation as well. Graphically, Gunfire Games makes the Unreal Engine shine. It runs well for the most part, but there are FPS dips in more chaotic areas. Each of the four worlds is also very different. Earth is filled with the Root’s pestilence, as deserted buildings and cars are entwined by overgrowth. Rhom’s deserts offer primitive villages as well as high tech temples underneath. The sweltering swamps of Corsus are filled with insects and steam-powered devices. Finally, the lush jungles of Yaesha are filled with vibrant plants, with ziggurats dotting the landscape. Gunfire Games does an excellent job of making sure the worlds look and feel different.

    Audio design is also very strong. Enemies and weapons all sound different. What stood out was how ambient sounds enhanced the experience. On Earth, you could hear footsteps of enemies echoing from different floors, which made things even more atmospheric. Voice performance is sufficient and helps fill out the characters you meet. Music is used sparingly but does its job. The main theme is quite catchy and instantly familiar to those who have played Chronos.


    Remnant: From the Ashes is Gunfire Games’ best effort so far and punches high above its weight class. High replayability, with seamless cooperative action, combined with terrific presentation and implementation of various Souls systems results in a game that is fun, exhilarating, and rewarding. In a summer of smaller releases, Remnant easily stands with the best of them.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440094/remnant-from-the-ashes-pc/

  • scissors
    August 23rd, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    The PlayStation 4 was the best-selling console worldwide with 182,061 consoles sold for the week ending August 10, according to VGChartz estimates.

    The Nintendo Switch was the second best-selling console with sales of 180,818 consoles sold, followed by the Xbox One with 38,963 units, the 3DS with 16,666 units, and the PlayStation Vita with just 91 units.

    Global hardware estimates (Followed by lifetime sales):

    1. PlayStation 4 - 182,061 (98,791,149)
    2. Switch - 180,818 (36,577,359)
    3. Xbox One - 38,963 (43,063,809)
    4. 3DS - 16,666 (74,727,132)
    5. PS Vita - 91 (16,131,158)
    Americas (US, Canada, Latin America) hardware estimates:
    1. Switch - 70,734
    2. PlayStation 4 - 55,264
    3. Xbox One - 25,474
    4. 3DS - 8,004
    Europe hardware estimates:
    1. Playstation 4 - 84,617
    2. Nintendo Switch - 46,882
    3. Xbox One - 10,456
    4. 3DS - 5,540
    Asia (Japan, mainland Asia, Middle East) hardware estimates:
    1. Switch - 58,126
    2. PlayStation 4 - 37,364
    3. 3DS - 2,714
    4. Xbox One - 1,146
    5. PS Vita - 92
    Oceania (Australia and New Zealand) hardware estimates:
    1. Switch - 5,076
    2. PlayStation 4 - 4,816
    3. Xbox One - 1,887
    4. 3DS - 418

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440091/worldwide-hardware-estimates-for-the-week-ending-august-10/

  • scissors
    August 23rd, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    The PlayStation 4 was the best-selling console worldwide with 182,061 consoles sold for the week ending August 10, according to VGChartz estimates.

    The Nintendo Switch was the second best-selling console with sales of 180,818 consoles sold, followed by the Xbox One with 38,963 units, the 3DS with 16,666 units, and the PlayStation Vita with just 91 units.

    Global hardware estimates (Followed by lifetime sales):

    1. PlayStation 4 - 182,061 (98,791,149)
    2. Switch - 180,818 (36,577,359)
    3. Xbox One - 38,963 (43,063,809)
    4. 3DS - 16,666 (74,727,132)
    5. PS Vita - 91 (16,131,158)
    Americas (US, Canada, Latin America) hardware estimates:
    1. Switch - 70,734
    2. PlayStation 4 - 55,264
    3. Xbox One - 25,474
    4. 3DS - 8,004
    Europe hardware estimates:
    1. Playstation 4 - 84,617
    2. Nintendo Switch - 46,882
    3. Xbox One - 10,456
    4. 3DS - 5,540
    Asia (Japan, mainland Asia, Middle East) hardware estimates:
    1. Switch - 58,126
    2. PlayStation 4 - 37,364
    3. 3DS - 2,714
    4. Xbox One - 1,146
    5. PS Vita - 92
    Oceania (Australia and New Zealand) hardware estimates:
    1. Switch - 5,076
    2. PlayStation 4 - 4,816
    3. Xbox One - 1,887
    4. 3DS - 418

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440091/worldwide-hardware-estimates-for-the-week-ending-august-10/

  • scissors
    August 23rd, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    Microsoft's head of gaming services Ben Decker speaking with GameReactor in an interview revealed the team would like to see Game Pass on every platform. At the moment the subscription service is only available on the Xbox One and Windows 10 PCs. 

    "You know, we would like to see Game Pass on all platforms ultimately and I think that is a long term goal," said Decker. "We don't have any specific plans today, but we would love to see Game Pass really go everywhere."

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440093/microsoft-would-like-to-see-game-pass-on-all-platforms/

  • scissors
    August 23rd, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    Microsoft's head of gaming services Ben Decker speaking with GameReactor in an interview revealed the team would like to see Game Pass on every platform. At the moment the subscription service is only available on the Xbox One and Windows 10 PCs. 

    "You know, we would like to see Game Pass on all platforms ultimately and I think that is a long term goal," said Decker. "We don't have any specific plans today, but we would love to see Game Pass really go everywhere."

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440093/microsoft-would-like-to-see-game-pass-on-all-platforms/

  • scissors
    August 23rd, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    Microsoft's Aaron Greenberg speaking with Twinfinite in an interview teased there would be a "lot of surprises" at Microsoft's XO19 event in November. 

    "As we get into the Holiday, we really brought back the spirit of XO, which really was all about doing a celebration of all things Xbox," said Greenberg. "E3 is traditionally more of an industry event, whereas XO for us is really focused on the fans and our gamers who just want to celebrate with us.

    "That’s what we did at XO last year in Mexico City, that’s what we’re doing at XO19 this year in London. We do an Inside Xbox Show, we do a live show. It is our biggest Inside Xbox show of the year. We have a lot of surprises planned. We have a lot of content coming both from Xbox Game Studios, as long as third-party partners."

     

    Greenberg was asked if there would be games never seen before and he replied with a simple "yes." 

    "We have some surprises planned, I’ll just leave it at that," he added. "But yeah, I think that we’ll have a great show.  We also have a lot of games coming out in the spring, It’s I think the biggest lineup of games we’re ever had in the spring. In that window of time between XO and E3, we have a lot of stuff to show, and people can get hands-with it and talk about it.

    "So that will hopefully be some goodness for the fans that at that point will have already make their holiday purchases, and they’ll be thinking about what they’re going to play in the spring, and what’s coming to Game Pass in the spring, and so we can start talking about that as well."

    XO19 takes place in London at the Copper Box Arena from November 14 to 16.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440092/microsoft-on-xo19-in-november-we-have-a-lot-of-surprises-planned/

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