XBox 360 Universe Straight from the source
  • scissors
    November 30th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    The Adam Jensen “I didn’t ask for this” meme comes to mind when thinking of how Caipirinha Games/Toplitz Productions’ Police Chase occupied space on my hard drive.  A friend had a twisted thought that he put in action: gift Lee this 1-star rated game and dare him to review it.  As people like me are wont to do, I was up to the task if only to take a cursory glance at what the fuss was about.  The result?  I didn’t even buy the game and still I’m wondering if there’s a way to charge Toplitz with Grand Theft.

    You take control of Tom, a rookie out to prove he’s worthy of the badge.  With your robotically monotone partner, Patrick, you’ll perform police-oriented tasks ranging from the rudimentary to sting operations.  Your work for City Police (I don’t remember them ever stating their location) is about getting crime off the streets, and occasionally winning some races. 

    If I had a scintilla of care perhaps I’d extol more of the actual plot, but it becomes more about the egotistical protagonist going to the station with his partner, HQ receiving a call, and simply responding to said call.  There’s something of an arc with uncovering who hit your boss’s vehicle and a bombing plot, but they play out like insipid daytime-TV serials.  It’s about as exciting as a colonoscopy.  And Tom can’t help but sound obnoxious at every given moment. 

    “Aw, c’mon Claudia… don’t you think this hot stud is the one for you?”

    Virtually every interaction with girls brings this kind of attitude up to the surface. In some ways I think those cheesy rejoinders could’ve worked in a better story.  A middle-aged, womanizing cop looking to catch some chicks on the job?  I’ve heard worse.  But the awkward delivery makes every attempt a recoiling affair to sit through.   When hearing his voice and listening to these lines, I couldn’t help but think this was Tommy Wiseau’s misguided interpretation of how James Dean would act.  The voice actor sounds like he’s wrestling a smorgasbord of various accents while trying to come off as an American.  Then again, half of the enjoyment comes from this distraction compared to everyone else sounding stilted.  A wild car crash makes a race more memorable. 

    That’s all there is to it, really.  Tom just plays a straight hotshot at every cringe-inducing turn, his robotic partner pulls him back to the task at hand, police chief sometimes gets angry, and mysteries get solved without any sense of a checkered-flag finish.  That’s the campaign, aside from occasional police-sanctioned races for better vehicles (which interrupt during the middle of your investigations for some reason).  All of this told via interchangeable MS-Paint slides that look as stupid as the script sounds.  

    The same half-assed approach is transplanted to the mission structure as well.  Police Chase is a racing game through and through.  The story-focused missions run the gambit of driving to *x location*, then to another spot, and periodically tailing someone.  Ironically enough, around the halfway point of the campaign will be the first time you, as the police, chase down a suspect.

    All of these tasks are exacerbated by the static behavior of the world itself.  Guard rails, any sort of tree, specific pieces of the environment are ratcheted down solid; your car will commit to a full stop upon impact, regardless of speed.  So, one of the few exploratory elements common among racers is lopped off here in favor of this poorly-designed city acting like a rat maze.  It’s also weird how the game dedicates time talking about vehicle health and your gas tank, but does nothing meaningful with it.  I thought you’d be graded after each mission or consider your money before doing repairs.  None of that matters.  Just drive up to a gas or repair icon and you’re fine. 

    The racing mechanics barely make it over the hump of feeling functional.  There’s hardly any difference in vehicle handling aside from their respective max speeds.  Larger vehicles feel so unnecessarily top-heavy that I never got used to them—which made the game more unwelcoming considering a van is your starting vehicle.  Cars avoid the issue by feeling lower to the ground, but it’s tough to care when the wheels for all of them feel like they’re made out of cardboard.  Imagine a life-sized Hot Wheels car on the road and you’d get an idea of how incongruous the steering, drifting, and more would feel.  I haven’t had such a dreadful first impression of a racer since Coffin Dodgers.

    Even with such issues, Police Chase wouldn’t quite tip towards one of my most abominable experiences for this generation were it not for technical issues.  Granted, it’s not some high-profile case of Toplitz sneaking past Microsoft’s certification a la Assassin’s Creed: Unity.  But considering the work-arounds like the bits of the environment materializing in front of you in N64-era fashion and its already-appalling level of graphical fidelity, one would think that would be enough to not make me put up with an inconsistent framerate on an Xbox One X.  And God forbid I take control of that police drone one more time.  The only thing that prevented me from outright quitting said moments of single-digit framerate drops was their brevity.  There were also miscellaneous bugs, such as with one moment where a downed streetlight smashed the vehicle, resulting in my camera hovering inside the van’s interior ceiling.  There’s also the ability to break the game world by restarting missions in a specific way wherein all story HUD markers vanish. 

    Is all of this to say Police Chase is broken?  Technically… no.  It’s a case where you can’t argue that the essentials of driving, reversing, braking, and steering do function—albeit terribly in some casesBut these factors, including the admittedly enjoyable sensation in pulling a J-turn, are as far as I’d go.  Every other consideration feels unengaging.  Even the basic fundamentals of racing can be ignored, as off-roading for some maps can enable you to skip half of the track!

    In case you thought I was joking, these pictures are in fact from this game.  From top to bottom, it’s clear that every asset was purchased from a 3rd-party and no extra work was put into them.  Maybe, maybe, it took some pains to place Tom and Patrick character models in the car—unlike every other AI automobile.  Even all of the UI elements have no character.  Credit where it’s due: the paltry variety of vehicles don’t stack up to the average racing game today but they do at least look different enough to feel like rewards upon completing missions. 

    The less said about sound design the better.  You literally have to go to the options menu and change the default sound settings from zero, that’s how much the game wants to hide it.  Everything from the repeating soundtrack to rudimentary effects sound like they were lifted from a sketchy website.  If you want to get a sense of the aural experience you're in for: confine yourself to a small room with a leaf-blower and try to make gear-shifting sounds with your mouth.  Well, there's always the default setting if it bothers you.  

    Value is a strange one to delineate because, to its credit, there are various modes to tackle.  There’s a campaign, other races not included in the campaign, and a free play mode.  If you were to accumulate all of the hours to complete everything, perhaps that’d justify your dollar-per-hour threshold.  But when considering just how lazily-developed this game is, priced at thirty US dollars, this strikes me as highway robbery.  I have a habit of digging at terribly misguided games, even when they’re not being too pricey, but I think a punitive stance fits because this is such an insult. 

    Police Chase may go down as one of the worst games of this generation with this added qualifier: “to make it past a console’s modern certification process.”  It’s one of the priciest asset-flipped racing games I’ve ever seen.  And despite not spending one red cent of my money, there’s still this pit in my stomach as though I’d been robbed and am searching for recompense.  If games publishers & developers had badges, I’d tell these folks to turn theirs in. 

     

    Despite being one of newest writers on VGChartz, Lee has been a part of the community for over a decade. His gaming history goes back several console generations: having a N64 & old NES at home while also enjoying other console/PC titles elsewhere. Since then, he's always liked gaming across various systems--though real-life makes it burdensome at times. Lee's a General Contractor by trade, and has touched upon every critical aspect necessary to maintain a house: roofing, electrical, plumbing, and more. When not doing the daily grind, he can be found gaming (obviously!), writing about games (obviously again!), doing various recreational activities, or slowly grinding through the world's most-acclaimed books.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/441564/police-chase-xone/

  • scissors
    November 30th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    The VGChartz Gap charts are updated monthly and each article focuses on a different gap chart. The charts include comparisons between the 7th generation and 8th generation platforms, as well as comparisons within the 8th generation. All sales are worldwide, unless otherwise stated.

    XOne Vs. PS3 US:

    Gap change in latest month: 74,900 – PS3

    Gap change over last 12 months: 326,713 – PS3

    Total Lead: 3,735,043 - XOne

    XOne Total Sales: 25,936,903

    PS3 Total Sales: 22,201,860

    In October 2019 the gap in the US between the Xbox One and PlayStation 3 grew in favor of the PS3 when you align launches. The PS3 sold 74,900 more units than the Xbox One in the last month and by 326,713 units in the last 12 months.  The Xbox One currently leads by 3.74 million units.

    The Xbox One launched in the US on November 22, 2013, while the PlayStation 3 launched on November 17, 2006. The Xbox One has sold 25.94 million units in 71 months, while the PS3 sold 22.20 million units during the same timeframe.

    The PS3 sold 26.99 million units lifetime in the US. The Xbox One needs to sell another 1.05 million units to surpass the PS3.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/441566/xbox-one-vs-playstation-3-in-the-usvgchartz-gap-chartsoctober-2019/

  • scissors
    November 29th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    The VGChartz Gap charts are updated monthly and each article focuses on a different gap chart. The charts include comparisons between the 7th generation and 8th generation platforms, as well as comparisons within the 8th generation. All sales are worldwide, unless otherwise stated.

    Switch Vs. 3DS and Wii U USA:

    Gap change in latest month: 59,002 – 3DS and Wii U

    Gap change over last 12 months: 1,447,398 - Switch

    Total Lead: 314,000 - Switch

    Switch Total Sales: 13,999,884

    3DS and Wii U Total Sales: 13,685,884

    October 2019 is the 32nd month that the Nintendo Switch has been available for in the US. During the latest month the gap grew in favor of the combined sales of the 3DS and Wii U when compared to the Nintendo Switch during the same timeframe by 59,002 units. In the last 12 months the gap has grown in favor of the Switch by 1.45 million units. The Switch is currently ahead of the 3DS and Wii U by 314,000 units.

    The 3DS launched in March 2011 and the Wii U launched in November 2012, while the Nintendo Switch launched in March 2017. The Switch has sold 14.00 million units, while the 3DS and Wii U have sold 13.69 million units during the same timeframe.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/441565/switch-vs-3ds-and-wii-u-in-the-usvgchartz-gap-chartsoctober-2019/

  • scissors
    November 29th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    Football Manager 2020 has debuted in first on the EMEAA charts for the week ending November 24, 2019. 

    Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order remains in second place, while Call of Duty: Modern Warfare is up one spot to third. FIFA 20 is up one spot to fourth. 

    Pokémon Sword and Pokémon Shield drop in their second week as they are in fifth and sixth places, respectively. Nintendo does not release digital figures to the charts, otherwise it might be higher up. Grand Theft Auto V is up three spots to seventh place. 

    Here are the top 10 best-selling titles (combined physical and digital sales):

    1. Football Manager 2020 - NEW
    2. Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order
    3. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare
    4. FIFA 20
    5. Pokemon Sword
    6. Pokemon Shield
    7. Grand Theft Auto V
    8. Luigi's Mansion 3
    9. Need for Speed: Heat 
    10. Rainbow Six Siege
    The physical charts includes all games in Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Great Britain, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland.
     
    Digital data includes games sold in Australia, Austria, Bahrain, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Kuwait, Lebanon, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Oman, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine and UAE.
     
    The GSD charts includes games from Activision Blizzard, Bandai Namco, Capcom, Codemasters, EA, Focus Home Interactive, Koch Media, Microsoft, Milestone, Paradox, Sega, Sony, Square Enix, Ubisoft and Warner Bros.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/441563/football-manager-2020-debuts-in-1st-on-the-emeaa-charts/

  • scissors
    November 29th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    Shenmue III has debuted in 8th on the charts in Switzerland, according to SwissCharts.com for the 47th week of 2019.

    Pokemon Sword and Shield has remained at the top of the charts in its second week, while Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order remains in second place.

     

    Here are the top 10 best-selling games in Switzerland for Week 47, 2019:

    1. Pokemon Sword and Shield 
    2. Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order 
    3. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare
    4. FIFA 20
    5. Need for Speed: Heat
    6. Luigi's Mansion 3
    7. Mario Kart 8 Deluxe
    8. Shenmue III - NEW
    9. Mario & Sonic at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games
    10. Death Stranding

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/441562/shenmue-iii-debuts-in-8th-on-the-swiss-charts/

  • scissors
    November 29th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    The VGChartz Gap charts are updated monthly and each article focuses on a different gap chart. The charts include comparisons between the 7th generation and 8th generation platforms, as well as comparisons within the 8th generation. All sales are worldwide, unless otherwise stated.

    Switch Vs. Wii Japan:

    Gap change in latest month: 158,382 - NS

    Gap change over last 12 months: 2,746,904 - NS

    Total Lead: 1,562,284 - Wii

    Switch Total Sales: 9,902,896

    Wii Total Sales: 8,340,612

    October 2019 is the 32nd month that the Nintendo Switch has been available for. During the latest month the Switch increased its lead over the Wii by 158,382 units and by 2.75 million units in the last 12 months. The Switch is currently ahead of the Wii by 1.56 million units.

    The Wii launched in December 2006 in Japan, while the Nintendo Switch launched in March 2017. The Switch has sold 9.90 million units, while the Wii sold 8.34 million units during the same timeframe.

    The 32nd month for the Nintendo Switch is October 2019 and for the Wii it is July 2009.

    The Wii sold 12.77 million units lifetime in Japan. The Switch needs to sell another 2.87 million units to outsell the Wii.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/441560/switch-vs-wii-in-japanvgchartz-gap-chartsoctober-2019/

  • scissors
    November 28th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    Here we see data representing the global sales through to consumers and change in sales performance of the four home consoles and four handhelds over comparable periods for 2016, 2017, 2018, and 2019.  Also shown is the market share for each of the consoles over the same periods.

    Year to Date Sales Comparison (Same Periods Covered)

     

    Market Share (Same Periods Covered)

    2016 – (Week ending January 9 to November 26)

    2017 – (Week ending January 7 to November 25)

    2018 – (Week ending January 6 to November 24)

    2018 – (Week ending January 5 to November 23)

    Total Sales and Market Share for Each Year

    "Year to date" sales for 2016, 2017, 2018, and 2019 sales are shown in series at the top of the table and then just below a comparison of 2019 versus 2018 and 2018 versus 2017 is displayed.  This provides an easy-to-view summary of all the data.

    Microsoft

    • Xbox One – Down Year-on-Year 2,196,965 (-43.3%)

    Nintendo

    • Nintendo Switch - Up Year-on-Year 2,556,437 (23.6%)
    • Nintendo 3DS – Down Year-on-Year 1,616,773 (-60.1%)

    Sony

    • PlayStation 4 – Down Year-on-Year 3,854,140 (-26.4%)
    • PlayStation Vita – Down Year-on-Year 174,058 (-83.5%)

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/441561/year-on-year-sales-amp-market-share-charts-november-23-2019/

  • scissors
    November 28th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    Here we see data representing the global sales through to consumers and change in sales performance of the four home consoles and four handhelds over comparable periods for 2016, 2017, 2018, and 2019.  Also shown is the market share for each of the consoles over the same periods.

    Year to Date Sales Comparison (Same Periods Covered)

     

    Market Share (Same Periods Covered)

    2016 – (Week ending January 9 to November 26)

    2017 – (Week ending January 7 to November 25)

    2018 – (Week ending January 6 to November 24)

    2018 – (Week ending January 5 to November 23)

    Total Sales and Market Share for Each Year

    "Year to date" sales for 2016, 2017, 2018, and 2019 sales are shown in series at the top of the table and then just below a comparison of 2019 versus 2018 and 2018 versus 2017 is displayed.  This provides an easy-to-view summary of all the data.

    Microsoft

    • Xbox One – Down Year-on-Year 2,196,965 (-43.3%)

    Nintendo

    • Nintendo Switch - Up Year-on-Year 2,556,437 (23.6%)
    • Nintendo 3DS – Down Year-on-Year 1,616,773 (-60.1%)

    Sony

    • PlayStation 4 – Down Year-on-Year 3,854,140 (-26.4%)
    • PlayStation Vita – Down Year-on-Year 174,058 (-83.5%)

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/441561/year-on-year-sales-amp-market-share-charts-november-23-2019/

  • scissors
    November 28th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    Welcome to the second part of VGChartz's Top 50 Video Game Composers countdown. Before we continue on with spots 35 through 21, here are a few small facts and details about the composers that people voted for:

    • A total of 91 different composers received points during voting, with seven composers sharing the last spot with one point each.

    • Out of all the composers that received points, 52 were Japanese, with the rest coming mostly out of either Europe or North America. 20 non-Japanese composers made it into the top 50.

    • A total of nine composers missed the top 50 by a single point. I will talk about them in a little more detail in the next couple of articles when I cover the honourable mentions.

    If you missed the first part of this countdown you can check it out HERE.

    With that out of the way, let's continue on with the next set of composers in this top 50.

     

    #35–34 (Two-Way Tie)

    ZUN (Jun'ya Ōta)

    I would wager a guess that most people here aren't familiar with ZUN or his work. I certainly wasn't before looking him up for this list, and I can honestly say that doesn't happen very often these days. ZUN is the solo developer behind the Touhou Project series of games, for which he effectively does everything from behind the name Team Shanghai Alice.

    For a taste of ZUN's style of music check out 'Faith Is For the Transient People' from Touhou: Mountain of Faith and 'The Young Descendant of Tepes' from Touhou: Embodiment of Scarlet Devil.

     

    Sonic Mayhem (Sascha Dikiciyan)

    Dikiciyan got a rather unusual start to his career when he sent his fan-made alternate soundtrack for Quake to id Software. Impressed by his work, John Romero personally asked him to compose the music for Quake 2, which launched Dikiciyan's career. Since then he has worked on numerous high profile titles, including the likes of Unreal Tournament, Prototype, Borderlands, Mass Effect 3, Mortal Kombat 2011, and Injustice: Gods Among Us, just to name a few.

    Check out 'Crater Lake' from Borderlands 2 and 'The Covent Gardens' from Hellgate: London for a couple of examples of his work.

     

    #33

    Frank Klepacki

    Frank Klepacki began his career at Westwood Studios at the age of 17, just as the developer was about to make it big. His first video game score was for the classic PC RPG Eye of the Beholder II: The Legend of Darkmoon in 1991, after which he composed music for Dune II, the three Legend of Kyrandia games, Disney's The Lion King on the SNES, and Lands of Lore in just the first half of the 90s. Of course, Klepacki would soon after rise to fame with his work on the Command & Conquer series, for which he is most well known. In more recent years he has worked together with Petroglyph Games on a number of the developer's titles.

    'Blow it Up' from Command & Conquer: Red Alert 2 and 'Bounce' from Blade Runner give a very good idea of the mix of industrial and electronic music Klepacki often employs in his work.

     

    #32–31 (Two-way tie)

    Tomoya Ohtani

    If you've played any Sonic games over the last two decades you've most likely heard at least some of Tomoyo Ohtani's work - he's been serving as the series' sound director since the mid-2000s. Whatever your opinion of the later stage Sonic is, most people can usually agree that the music has been a consistent highpoint in most of the games, and much of the credit for that belongs to Ohtani, both as a composer and sound director. Naturally, he has composed music for a number of other games as well, but his main body of work can be found in the Sonic franchise.

    For some of Ohtani's excellent work, have a listen at 'Starlight Carnival (Act 1)' from Sonic Colors and 'REPORT 1 Ulala Again' from Space Channel 5 Part 2.

     

    Glenn Stafford

    Glenn Stafford is another composer whose name you might not recognize, but whose music you've likely encountered at least once at some point in your life. Stafford has worked at Blizzard Entertainment since 1993, and in that time has provided music for most of the games in the WarCraft, StarCraft and Diablo franchises, as well as various other titles throughout the years. His most recent works can be heard in the World of Warcraft expansion Battle for Azeroth.

    Check out 'Lordaeron Fall' from WarCraft III: Reign of Chaos, and 'Forged In Blood' from World of WarCraft: Wrath of the Lich King.

     

    #30–29 (Two-way tie)

    Kurt Harland

    Kurt Harland was actually a veteran of the music industry and had found success as part of the synthpop band Information Society long before he ever composed music for video games. He began his video game career in 1995, composing music for games like Scooby-Doo Mystery and Nightmare Circus, but he is without question best known for his work in the Legacy of Kain series, starting with Legacy of Kain: Soul Reaver in 1999. He last worked on music for Resistance: Burning Skies in 2012, after which he has seemingly left the video game business, though it seems he did work on Just Cause 4 as a dialogue editor, at least according to some sources.

    'Anticipation Before Battle' from Legacy of Kain: Soul Reaver and 'Ariel's Lament' from Soul Reaver 2 are a good place to start with Harland's work.

     

    Ed Harrison (0edit)

    A relative newcomer as a composer with only a few credits to his name thus far, Ed Harrison (or 0edit) has regardless already established himself as someone to keep an eye out for in the future. His first official video game score was for the 2009 indie multiplayer FPS Neotokyo, but most people likely first heard his work on Deus Ex: Mankind Divided, for which he provided a handful of tracks, and the game's Breach mode, which Harrison composed in its entirety. More recently he co-composed the music for Tsioque, an indie point & click adventure game released in 2018.

    Check out 'Breaching the Veil' from Deus Ex: Mankind Divided and 'Courtyard' from Tsioque for a sample of Harrison's work.

     

    #28

    Mahito Yokota

    Despite beginning his career at Koei back in 1998, Yokota's most popular and well known works have come while working at Nintendo over the past 16 years. At Nintendo his first project was Donkey Kong Jungle Beat, after which he was in charge of the orchestration of the The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess soundtrack. However, his true claim to fame is his work in the Super Mario Bros. series, beginning with Super Mario Galaxy and Super Mario Galaxy 2. Over the last five years Yokota has mostly worked as a sound director and music supervisor with other people actually composing the music, but he still provides the occasional track himself as well.

    For arguably Yokota's most well known works you kind of have to go to Super Mario Galaxy and its sequel. So have a listen to 'Wind Garden (Gusty Garden Galaxy)' and 'Space Storm Galaxy'.

     

    #27

    Bobby Prince

    If you were a fan of id Software or first-person shooters in the 90s you're most likely very familiar with Bobby Prince's work. He is the composer behind the music of Doom, Doom II: Hell On Earth, Duke Nukem 3D (co-composed with Lee Jackson), a pair of Commander Keen games, and a number of other classic id and Apogee Software games. However, following the release of Axis & Allies in 1998, Prince more or less left the video game industry, having only returned once since then to compose the music for a game called Wrack in 2014.

    Check out 'Sign of Evil' from Doom and 'Aliens, Say Your Prayers' from Duke Nukem 3D for an example of Prince's classic pieces from the 90s.

     

    #26

    Tim Follin

    There are few composers in the video game industry back in the 1980s and 90s who were able to push the hardware they were working with further than Tim Follin. Often working together with his brother Geoff, Tim was responsible for the music in games like Silver Surfer and Solstice on the NES, Spider-Man and the X-Men in Arcade's Revenge and Rock n' Roll Racing on the SNES, as well as Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future on the Dreamcast.

    My personal favourite pieces by Follin are 'Stage 1' from Silver Surfer and 'Aquamarine Bay' from Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future, and they perfectly showcase Follin's versatility as a composer.

     

    #25

    Tappi Iwase

    Tappi Iwase is one of those composers whose careers are practically defined by their work within a single franchise, in his case that franchise being Metal Gear Solid. However, throughout his career Iwase has provided music for a number of other games as well, most notably Suikoden and Suikoden II. Of course, there is still a very good reason why he is best known for his work in the MGS series, as those titles contain most of his best work.

    Iwase's most famous work is without question 'Metal Gear Solid Main Theme' from Metal Gear Solid, but check out 'Beautiful Golden City' from Suikoden as well for something quite different from him.

     

    #24

    Miki Higashino

    Speaking of Suikoden, the person we have to thank for most of the music in the first two games in the series is Miki Higashino. She began her career in the mid-80s at Konami, composing music for various classic titles including Gradius, Salamander, and Gradius III, followed by the likes of Contra III: The Alien Wars in the 90s. Higashino then created arguably her greatest pieces of video game music for the first two Suikoden games. She left Konami in 2001, and since then she has worked quite sporadically in the video game industry, but by that time she had already done more than enough to establish her legacy as one of the best composers to have ever worked in it.

    For some of Higashino's best work have a listen at 'Reminiscence' from Suikoden II and 'An Old Irish Song' from Suikoden (let it play past the intro).

     

    #23–22 (Two-Way Tie)

    Takashi Tateishi

    One of the many composers who worked at Capcom in the late 80s, Takashi Tateishi established his legacy within the industry over a very short period of time. His first work was a single track for the arcade game 1943 Kai in 1988, followed soon after by a score to the game that is to this day his most famous work - Mega Man 2. He would then work on the music and sound on a handful of other titles before leaving Capcom in 1989, after composing a single track for U.N. Squadron. His only later video game works have been the Stage Clear theme for Mega Man 10 and a track called 'Desolate Highway' for Mighty No. 9.

    Despite his very short career as a video game composer, Tateishi created some of the most iconic pieces of video game music of all time, such as 'Dr. Wily Stage 1' from Mega Man 2. Also, check out 'Forest Stronghold ~ Round 3from U.N. Squadron and the aforementioned 'Desolate Highway' from Mighty No. 9.

     

    Toby Fox

    Out of all the composers in this top 50, at age 28 Toby Fox is the youngest by a fairly comfortable margin and has only been composing music professionally for video games since 2015. This speaks volumes to the level of talent he has not only as a composer but as a game designer too, as well as about how strongly his work has resonated with people. Fox rose to prominence with Undertale in 2015 and since then he has worked on a number of different projects, including his next game Deltarune, as well as the likes of Hiveswap, Little Town Hero, and even Super Smash Bros. Ultimate and Pokemon Sword and Shield.

    For Toby Fox you should naturally check out 'Another Medium' from Undertale, as that game's soundtrack is easily his best known work as a composer. For something outside of that particular sphere take a listen to 'Angard Battle' from Little Town Hero.

     

    #21

    Alexander Brandon

    Alexander Brandon is arguably among the most talented western video game composers of the last 25 years, having worked on such high profile games as Jazz Jackrabbit 2, Unreal Tournament, Deus Ex, and more recently on Dust: An Elysian Tale, and Aven Colony, among many others. In recent years Brandon has worked more as a sound designer and audio director than as composer, but he does still create music for a variety of different titles, just not as often as he did in the past.

    Here's 'Main Title' from Deus Ex and 'Beneath Hollow Grounds' from Dust: An Elysian Tale for just a small taste of Brandon's talents as a composer.

     

    And that's it for the second part of our countdown. Next time we'll start taking much more in-depth looks into these composers' careers and music - and there will be no more ties either, which is nice!

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/441557/vgchartzs-top-50-video-game-composers-3521/

  • scissors
    November 28th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    With Thanksgiving now here in the US a long list of Black Friday 2019 deals are also now available. A long list of retailers physical and online have started their Black Friday deals early. 

    Nintendo Switch and Nintendo Switch Lite consoles have been discounted, as well as games, controllers, Nintendo Online, and more.

    Here is a list of some of the Xbox One Black Friday 2019 discounts:

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/441556/nintendo-switch-black-friday-deals-switch-bundles-switch-lite-games-more/

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