XBox 360 Universe Straight from the source
  • scissors
    September 30th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    According to a WSJ report, Atelier Ryza - the latest entry in the long-running JRPG series from Gust and Koei-Tecmo - has sold more than 150,000 copies in Japan across PS4 & Nintendo Switch in its launch week.

    Link

    This marks the strongest debut in the franchise's history and the game is already sold out at many stores. The report also details that early pre-orders from overseas suggests strong interest in the title.

    Atelier Ryza: Ever Darkness & the Secret Hideout will launch in the west on October 29th.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440722/atelier-ryza-tops-150000-units-sold-in-japan-strongest-debut-in-franchise-history/

  • scissors
    September 30th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    According to a WSJ report, Atelier Ryza - the latest entry in the long-running JRPG series from Gust and Koei-Tecmo - has sold more than 150,000 copies in Japan across PS4 & Nintendo Switch in its launch week.

    Link

    This marks the strongest debut in the franchise's history and the game is already sold out at many stores. The report also details that early pre-orders from overseas suggests strong interest in the title.

    Atelier Ryza: Ever Darkness & the Secret Hideout will launch in the west on October 29th.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440722/atelier-ryza-tops-150000-units-sold-in-japan/

  • scissors
    September 30th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    Nintendo have announced a new in their Brain Age/Brain Training franchise for Nintendo Switch, which will be launching in Japan in December. The game includes a stylus accessory at retail which can be bought separately if you purchase the download version. Watch the trailer below:

    Five mini-games will use the Joy-Con controller and can therefore not be played on the Switch Lite, while the game as a whole will not be compatible with paired Joy-Cons, the Joy-Con grip or the Switch Pro Controller.

    Brain Age for Nintendo Switch will be available on the 27th of December for 3,480 yen at retail and 2,680 yen via download. A western release has not yet been announced but will likely be revealed in the coming weeks.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440721/brain-age-for-nintendo-switch-announced/

  • scissors
    September 30th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    Bobby Prince, the musical mind behind the scores in Doom, Doom II, Duke Nukem 3D, and many more video games has filed a lawsuit against Gearbox, Randy Pitchford, and Valve. Prince says that they used his music in Duke Nukem 3D 20th Anniversary: World Tour, which launched in 2016, without his permission.

    The original music, which was used in this re-release, was part of a contract with the original developer Apogee. Prince's lawyers state that "Apogee had a limited right to use Mr. Prince’s music in Duke Nukem 3D in exchange for a royalty equal to $1 per unit sold".

    Gearbox purchased certain rights to the Duke Nukem games, but apparently neglected to cover themselves for the use of Prince's music. Perhaps more notable is that Prince alleges that he contacted Randy Pitchford directly and was told he'd be "taken care of", but never received any compensation or royalties. Pitchford also refused to remove the music from the game.

    The companies involved have 21 days to respond to the summons.

    Sources: Bloomberg law via PCGamer

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440720/duke-nukem-3d-composer-begins-lawsuit-against-gearbox-amp-valve/

  • scissors
    September 30th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening has debuted at the top of the charts in Switzerland, according to SwissCharts.com for the 38th week of 2019. Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch Remastered debuted in sixth place, and Bus Simulator debuted in ninth.

    Here are the top 10 best-selling games in Switzerland for Week 38, 2019:

    1. The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening - NEW
    2. Borderlands 3
    3. NHL 20
    4. Mario Kart 8 Deluxe
    5. eFootball PES 2020 
    6. Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch Remastered - NEW
    7. NBA 2K20
    8. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild
    9. Bus Simulatar - NEW
    10. Minecraft

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440719/the-legend-of-zelda-links-awakening-debuts-in-1st-on-the-swiss-charts/

  • scissors
    September 30th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening (NS) has debuted at the top of the French charts in week 38, 2019, according to SELL. The limited edition debuted in second place.

    Top sellers per system were as follows:

    PS4
    1. Borderlands 3
    2. NBA 2K20
    3. EFootball PES 2020
    Xbox One
    1. Borderlands 3
    2. Gears 5
    3. NBA 2K20
    Nintendo Switch
    1. The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening
    2. The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening Limited Edition
    3. Mario Kart 8 Deluxe
    Nintendo 3DS
    1. Pokemon Sun
    2. Yo-Kai Watch 3
    3. Pokemon Moon
    PC
    1. Borderlands 3
    2. The Sims 4
    3. Farming Simulator 19

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440717/the-legend-of-zelda-links-awakening-debuts-at-the-top-of-the-french-charts/

  • scissors
    September 30th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    Arc System Works has released a new trailer for New Guilty Gear that features May. It was also announced Axl Low will be a playable character.

    View the May trailer below:

    New Guilty Gear will launch for the PlayStation 4 in 2020.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440716/new-guilty-gear-gets-may-trailer-adds-axl-low-as-a-playable-character/

  • scissors
    September 30th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    Dragonest announced Auto Chess will launch for the Nintendo Switch and PlayStation 4 in 2020. 


    Here is an overview of the game:

    Auto Chess is a brand new, highly competitive multiplayer online strategy game created by Drodo and Dragonest, released and technically supported by Dragonest. Players will build their own economy system and use unique units to fight against each other in an eight-player, last man standing scenario. Pit your strategy skills against seven other players at the same time and proof your skill to adapt your strategies in real-time. ImbaTV will manage Auto Chess‘ global eSports tournaments. No matter where you’re from, you can challenge the top players from all over the world. The world’s top Auto Chess eSports league awaits!

    Key Features:

    • Innovative Gameplay – By collecting / changing Hero cards and arranging different formations, eight chess gamers will content for first prize in the following tens of minutes. Millions of players are challenging each other every day in what has become one of the most popular leisure modern gameplay.
    • Fair Play – Make a real fair-play game! The World eSports Games are created by Dragonest, Drodo, and lmbaTV. A million prize pool awaits!
    • Strategy Rules the World – Players will randomly get their Heroes in the Sharing Cardpool, and form special formations according to their unique strategies. Evolution, combination, jockey for position, and so on enable you to practice your strategies to the greatest extent. Will you be able to adapt to the changing tide and survive till the end?
    • Global Server – No matter where you come from, welcome to our world and challenge players from all over the world!

    Thanks Gematsu.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440715/auto-chess-headed-to-switch-and-ps4-in-2020/

  • scissors
    September 30th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    Spoiler Warning: This preview contains spoilers for the first part of the Sword Art Online Alicization anime series. It's not recommended to read further if you haven't yet watched it but plan to do so.

    After testing the waters with shooting and cyberpunk in Sword Art Online Fatal Bullet, Namco Bandai's game series has returned to blades and heroic fantasy in Sword Art Online Alicization Lycoris. With Alicization being the next big chapter in Reki Kawahara's novel, and the anime adaptation coming at a close next year, it was only natural for the publisher to jump into that universe for the next entry in the video game franchise.

    There wasn't just one but rather two different demos for Sword Art Online Alicization Lycoris at Tokyo Game Show 2019. The first one was focused on exploration and teamplay, while the second one was more narrative driven and including a major boss fight. The exploration demo revealed a few major points. First of all, we now know that the party will include up to four characters fighting alongside eachother at once, and that you can change the leader at any time. In the demo, you start as Kirito, but it was possible to control the original heroine of the game, Medina. Eugeo and Alice were also in the group but weren't actually playable. Nevertheless, both have been confirmed to be playable by the developers, so this time fans certainly won't be disappointed about having only one playable character. That in turn is very good news not just from a fan perspective but also in terms of gameplay variety. 

    So how does it play? So far - fantastically. Blows feel a lot heavier than before, which immediately improves the feeling of the fights. In addition to regular sword combos, each character has four arts that can be performed by pressing R1 and one of the PlayStation buttons. Those arts are powerful sword skills with lavish special effects and animations. I've played the entire series and I think it's a significant step up compared to Sword Art Online Hollow Realization. In the latter title combat was very sluggish, but that's not the case here.

    The ten minutes I was able to play Sword Art Online Alicization Lycoris for were really something else. I could feel the energy bursting from the confrontation against the boss monster in particular. You can aim with Kirito's thrust skill, just like in the anime series. The voice acting is also especially good, and characters say the famous magic spells of the Alicization universe out loud. There are lot of small visual and sound details like this that provide a terrific atmosphere that's very comparable to the TV show.

    Producer Yosuke Futami has said that the development team was going for a deeper combat experience and that certainly seems to be the case, at least based on these demos. In an interview with Futami, it was noted that dodging and guarding are now key elements if you want to win. The demo even includes a "just guard" system, where you can counterattack more effectively if you push the guard button shortly before being hit, and that was particularly pleasant to use.

    Tweaks like these to the battle system completely transform the way you fight in Sword Art Online Alicization Lycoris, making it more dynamic and exciting to play. The player is more actively involved and combat is more visceral and engaging as a result. The only drawback is that I ran into camera issues in the exploration demo, with walls and other background objects making it hard to get a clear view at all times.

    The story demo featured Eugeo's and Kirito's fight against Alice, which is a memorable part of the TV show. That scene was perfectly recreated within the game, even including Alice's superb "Enhance Armament" (where her blade turns into lethal golden petals). Character modelling is fairly good, although the graphics seem less sharp in active gameplay (I suspect this may be a result of having to play very close to the screen at TGS). 

    The main thing I want to point out about the boss fight is how hard it seemed to be. Alice depleted my HP really quickly, although Kirito could still fight for some reason (maybe this was done intentionally for demo purposes). The ten minutes given to play the game weren't enough to beat her, not least because she was casting confusion on my party all of the time. In confusion state, all controls are inverted and it's difficult to land a single hit. The conclusion I take from this is that Sword Art Online Alicization Lycoris will surely be no less difficult than previous SAO games, and that's a good thing. These adaptations have never made compromises on difficulty level in order to appease newcomers and I'm happy to see that tradition continue here, not least because the refined battle system absolutely needs tough opponents in order for it to shine.

    Playing Sword Art Online Alicization Lycoris at Tokyo Game Show 2019 completely changed my opinion on Bandai Namco's title. The more action-oriented battle system was exhilarating and performed far above my expectations, leaving me hungry for more. With new playable characters being announced with each update, and seeing how well they've been implemented into the game so far in these demos, the game looks equally promising from a content perspective as well.

    Preview based on two 10-minute demos available at Tokyo Game Show 2019.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440714/sword-art-online-alicization-lycoris-exceeds-expectations-at-tgs-2019/

  • scissors
    September 29th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    “Killer app” is a phrase that gets thrown around a lot in the early years of a new console’s life, but particularly so when sales aren’t as strong as they should be. It refers to that game that turns the hardware into a must-have item and which helps to define the console’s direction and life – think Halo on the original Xbox, or Wii Sports on the Nintendo Wii. Often, the relevance of a killer app will reduce over time as the software library becomes more fleshed out, but it still holds key importance early on (think how key The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild was early in the Nintendo Switch’s life).

    Many would argue – and I wouldn’t really disagree – that the PlayStation Vita never really had a killer app. There wasn’t that one piece of software that helped change the console’s fortunes. The closest we got was arguably Persona 4 Golden, an early release that received huge critical acclaim, but it was part of a niche series and as such its sales impact from a hardware perspective was muted.

    There were missed opportunities along the way, as certain titles had the potential to change the Vita’s fortunes, but the way the final product was delivered (if indeed it was delivered at all) left a lot to be desired and so they didn’t reach their full potential. It’s these games I’m aiming to look at this in this article – 10 games that were missed opportunities on Vita. I’m not saying that every release I’ll be talking out here had the potential to be a “killer app”, but if they had been executed a little better they would have undoubtedly been a key factor in helping the console reach a wider audience.

     

    BioShock


    When Ken Levine took to Sony’s stage at E3 2011 to announce that the critically acclaimed BioShock series was coming to Vita, expectations were high for another stellar entry in the franchise that would be tailor-made for portable hardware. Years passed without any update regarding where development was at – some people speculated it would be set in the world of Infinite, others suggested it would be a port of the iOS version of the original BioShockBy July 2014 the game had been officially cancelled, with Sony and Take Two failing to come to an agreement to even allow development to begin.

    BioShock was a missed opportunity for a number of reasons. It was an early tentpole reveal for Vita and had a lot of hype behind it; the fact that it didn’t happen at all shows the level of apathy from Sony towards the machine. Apathy that caused many to (rightly) question its future. It was also the kind of big-name, well-received series that would have helped fully establish the handheld in the market. Levine revealed that the title would’ve likely been a Final Fantasy Tacticsesque SRPG and, had this been pulled off well, it could have opened the door for more blockbuster series treating Vita as a machine for more experimental spin-off side-stories.

     

    Borderlands 2

    When it was announced that Sony it was working with Gearbox Software to bring the critically-acclaimed and commercially-successful looter-shooter sequel Borderlands 2 to the PlayStation Vita, it presented a fantastic opportunity to re-invent the device, which had up to that point struggled in sales in the west. In particular, something like Borderlands – a title with tonnes of replayability and a sea of content – would’ve made the perfect showcase handheld game, especially as it was bundled alongside the newly-launched LCD Vita hardware.

    Unfortunately, in the process of cutting the game down to get it running on the console, developer Iron Galaxy made a number of concessions that ended up butchering the experience. While graphical elements remained mostly in tact, things like corpses would explode upon death and the draw distance was significantly reduced. More disappointing was the fact that multiplayer was dropped from 4 to 2 players... and yet performance still suffered, regularly dropping into single figures, making it unplayable for some. Coupled with the fact that not all of the DLC was included and you had an incomplete package that ended up not being the smash hit it could have been.

     

    Call of Duty: Black Ops Declassified

    If Borderlands could be classified as a disappointment, then Call of Duty is what I would call a disaster. Supposedly the flagship title of the Vita’s first holiday season, it was initially shown off via an underwhelming logo reveal during E3 2012, before a Gamescom trailer demonstrated why it was being kept so much under wraps – it just wasn’t very good. It eventually released in November to underwhelming reviews (I found it to be very disappointing), although it would still go on to become one of the console’s best-selling titles, mostly from name recognition alone.

    The reasons why it turned out to be such a mess aren’t exactly clear, but rumour has it that Activision was originally planning on porting Black Ops II to Vita before realising that the handheld couldn’t run it. Being contractually bound to deliver the title before the end of the year, the publisher hired the only developer with a working FPS engine on Vita (Nihilistic Software) to churn it out in just five months, leading to features like zombies being cut and a campaign that lasted less than an hour. There’s clearly a solid enough base underneath, so had a little more time and care gone into the title it could well have been a killer app that offered a fully-fledged Call of Duty experience on the go.

     

    FIFA

    Nowadays, FIFA is a gaming institution, selling tens of million copies every year and breaking records with each successive version. Unsurprisingly, sales are strongest on home consoles, where people can play with their friends, but a fully-featured handheld iteration would undoubtedly offer something unique. That's sort of what FIFA Football did when it released alongside Vita’s launch in 2012, offering a port of the year-old FIFA ’11. It received solid reviews despite lacking a coveted ‘Ultimate Team’ mode.

    Unfortunately, rather than building on this base in order to make a better game by the time FIFA ’13 rolled around, publisher EA simply opted to release the same game with updated rosters and kits (a simple case of re-skinning the assets that were already there). It’s a process EA repeated for the subsequent FIFA ’14 and FIFA ’15 versions, meaning that fans quickly became disillusioned. Rather than building a portable sports game fanbase, EA just milked a few extra quid from Vita fans. It was a massive disappointment, but unfortunately it's not a habit EA is looking to change any time soon –  the cycle is currently being repeated on Nintendo Switch.

     

    The Jak & Daxter Trilogy

    Now let me preface this by saying that, personally, I’m a huge fan of the Jak & Daxter Trilogy on Vita, as I can see past its flaws and am just in awe that three of my favourite PS2 games of all time are available on a handheld console. I can’t, however, defend the fact that objectively it’s among the worst ports available on the console. All three games suffer from audio and graphical issues, massive bouts of slowdown, and occasional crashes, making them quite an ordeal to play through at times.

    The reason I’m including it in this list is because it had the potential to be the start of something fantastic for Vita. We’d already seen the handheld was capable of handling PS2 ports, with the brilliant Metal Gear Solid HD Collection, and it was beginning to seem like the console could have had a rebirth as a portable PS2. Unfortunately, with sloppy ports like Jak and subsequent efforts from Sony (everything from God of War to Ratchet to Sly had some sort of issue) this didn’t come to pass, which is a real shame.

     

    Little Deviants

    Not everything can be Wii Sports – in fact, few if any games will ever achieve the runaway success that title did when it came packaged in with the Wii in 2006. Yet many games have tried to capture that lightning-in-a-bottle of being the showcase title for a new piece of tech, from Kinect Sports on the Kinect to NintendoLand on the WiiU. Little Deviants was very much that game for Vita – something designed to show off the unique hardware and what it was capable of.

    The problem with Little Deviants is that it just isn’t very good. It contains a selection of mini-games that show off everything from the front and rear touch pads to the microphones and gyroscope, but rather than being compelling examples to show why the Vita’s hardware was an evolution in the market, they just come across as minor distractions without any substance to them. Wii Sports' Bowling was a revolution that families across the globe played together and it’s a real shame the team at BigBig Studios couldn’t realise anything remotely similar in Little Deviants.

     

    Phantasy Star Nova

    On PSP, Monster Hunter – a series where you hunt giant monsters – went from being a relatively popular franchise to an absolute… well, monster. Particularly in Japan, where local ad-hoc play took off, it became a regular multi-million seller and spawned a sea of imitators, the most successful of which was SEGA’s Phantasy Star Portable series. Based on the earlier Phantasy Star Universe titles, it offered tense team-based missions in the series’ familiar sci-fi universe and went on to sell more than 600k copies in Japan alone.

    So when SEGA announced a new Vita entry – Phantasy Star Nova – in 2013, expectations were high that it would continue this success. Sadly, thanks to a poorly-received demo (which did lead to some improvements based on fan feedback, albeit too little too late for some) and the fact that it was based on Phantasy Star Online 2 (which was already available on Vita), the game launched to mediocre numbers in Japan and didn’t end up being the killer app that I’d imagine both SEGA and Sony had hoped it would be. Worse still, the game was never released in English – a frustrating omission that would undoubtedly have helped it achieve greater success, especially on the back of similar hunting titles on Vita such as Freedom Wars.

     

    PlayStation All-Stars Battle Royale

    As with the Jak & Daxter Trilogy, let me open by saying that I love PlayStation All-Stars Battle Royale – a crossover 2D fighting game that is heavily inspired by Nintendo’s Super Smash Bros. and has characters from various PlayStation franchises duking it out for supremacy. It released in late 2012 as a cross-buy title across PS3 & Vita (one of the earliest games to use this initiative) and certainly had a lot of hype behind it prior to release, although unfortunately it also had a lot of baggage too.

    Criticism stemmed from two key things. The first was that the game borrowed much too heavily from Smash, but replaced one of its key systems (ring-outs) with a ‘supers’ system that didn’t work anywhere near as well. The second was the limited roster. Dozens of historic PlayStation franchises like Crash BandicootFinal FantasyResident Evil, and Spyro the Dragon weren’t represented, meaning it wasn’t really the celebration title Sony was presenting it as. I can look past these issues and enjoy it for what it is, but it’s hard to deny that it was a big missed opportunity to offer a unique experience based on PlayStation’s rich history.

     

    Tales of Innocence R

    As part of its early support for the Vita in Japan, Namco decided to remake the previously Nintendo DS-only Tales titles, including Tales of Innocence R. Despite being a low-budget title that felt like it was originally designed for the PSP, it received fairly positive reviews and sold well enough for another remake to follow in 2013 (Tales of Hearts R, although sadly the heavily-hinted Tales of Tempest R never came to fruition).

    Rather than quickly localizing this to take advantage of the post-launch software drought in the west, the game was never translated into English and remains a Japan-only exclusive to this day (unless you use the fan translation patch). While it wouldn’t have really been a killer app, there was undoubtedly a missed opportunity here for Namco to release it in the west in 2012 when Persona 4 was riding high in the sales charts and Vita owners were clamoring for a new JRPG to follow it up with. Tales of Innocence R could’ve easily filled a gap in the market, but instead its legacy is as a niche import.

     

    Warriors Lair/Ruin


    Another unfortunately cancelled Vita game that showed huge potential, Warrior’s Lair (previous known as Ruin) was a Diablo-inspired isometric action RPG with a unique twist. You were set to be able to build your own ‘lairs’ to store valuable treasures that you’d come across in the single player adventure, and these could then be invaded by other players. This unique customisation aspect would undoubtedly have enhanced the life of the title. And leaked gameplay looked plenty enjoyable on its own even without this feature.  

    Sadly, despite being trailed fairly heavily early in the console’s life and reportedly being quite far along in developmentWarrior’s Lair was taken off developer Idol Minds and brought in-house to Sony’s San Diego Studio, before being cancelled a short while later. It was a missed opportunity for a number of reasons, not least because it would have filled the massive Diablo-shaped gap in the handheld’s library (ensuring that it would have sold very well)but also because it would’ve released as a Sony-published title at a time when the manufacturer was heavily pulling back support for the machine. Perhaps this show of faith would have convinced other publishers to stay on board longer than they did, but whatever the impact it’s a shame this one never saw the light of day.  

     

    Conclusion

    No one factor really caused Vita to do as poorly as it did on the market; it was a combination of things, from the pricey memory cards, to the rise of smartphones, to the common first-year software drought. Undoubtedly, though, the quality (or lack thereof) of the games in this list (or in some cases, them not appearing at all) contributed to the Vita’s ultimate fate. Alone, they might not have righted the ship, but together they could have helped the machine appeal to a wider audience.

    In some instances, it was a case of timing – Call of Duty was shoved out of the door to meet a deadline, while Borderlands 2 suffered similar issues with the release of the LCD Vita in the west. In other instances, it was some kind of contractual issue – BioShock didn’t happen because supposedly Sony and Take-Two couldn’t come to any kind of agreement on it, while PlayStation All-Stars was hamstrung by third parties needing to agree to include their characters in the game.

    For a lot of the titles on this list, though, there’s just no logical reason for things turning out the way they did. It wouldn’t have taken much for EA to put more than just a re-skin of FIFA every year, while Jak & Daxter just needed more care putting into its porting process. Whatever the reason, I find it fascinating to look at the way things could have been. I still love my Vita so much for what it is, but can’t help but lament that it could have been something even more.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440713/10-playstation-vita-software-missed-opportunities/

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