XBox 360 Universe Straight from the source
  • scissors
    December 31st, 2018GamespotUncategorized


    Massive scale, massive budgets, massive number of hours played, massive sales... Everything about shooters nowadays is massive. With Call of Duty having been leading software sales in America nearly every year of the last decade, the genre is among the most important in gaming and there's a lot at stake in the yearly competition. Far Cry 5 has been selling at record pace and Call of Duty: Black Ops IIII still rules in every country, so shooter fans have clearly devoted themselves to their favorite genre this year. And despite having muted sales receptions our other shortlisted titles - Battlefield V and Insurgency: Sandstorm - offered high quality experiences in 2018.

     

     The Shortlist:

     

    Call of Duty: Black Ops IIII

     

    Battlefield V

     

    Far Cry 5

     

    Insurgency: Sandstorm

     

     

     

    The Winner:


    Far Cry 5

    Funny that at a time when some consider solo campaigns to be surplus to requirements, our shooter of the year happens to be the most single player-focused one of the year from the big beasts. Ever since its first presentation, Far Cry 5 has caught the eyes of FPS fans all over the world thanks to its eccentric world, quirky characters, and its freedom of gameplay. Ubisoft's game has forged a strong identity for itself, in stark contrast to many FPS games that tend to blur together a little bit too much; sometimes all you really need to offer is a unique and refreshing adventure.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/425722/best-shooter-of-2018/

  • scissors
    December 31st, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    Nintendo announced all of the games that will be releasing this week on the Nintendo Switch. 15 games in total will release this week.

     

    Here is the full list of games:

    January 1

    • Xenon Valkyrie+

    January 3

    • Animated Jigsaws: Wild Animals
    • Catastronauts
    • Don't Sink
    • Dreamwalker
    • JCB Pioneer: Mars
    • Job the Leprechaun
    • Johnny Turbo's Arcade: Fighter's History
    • Mentori Puzzle
    • Pic-a-Pix Pieces
    • The Aquatix Adventure of the Last Human
    • Unicornicopia

    January 4

    • Fitness Boxing
    • 99Seconds
    • Mad Age & This Guy

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/435118/new-nintendo-releases-this-week-xenon-valkyrie/

  • scissors
    December 30th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    After a fairly long month of rumours and speculation, Atlus have finally opened the teaser website for 'Persona 5 R' (P5R), which shows a short video (see below) and begins with a PlayStation Logo.

    No further details were given although the website notes that the next information about the project will be revealed in March 2019.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/435114/persona-5-r-teased-for-playstation-4/

  • scissors
    December 30th, 2018GamespotUncategorized


    Once again, action-adventure games delivered the goods in 2018. Open-ended, large-scale adventures dominated the year, with marquee titles like God of War, Spider-Man, and Red Dead Redemption making headlines and selling millions of copies. Players witnessed Assassin's Creed veer more dramatically into open-world RPG territory; God of War shift time, place, perspective, and mechanics; Red Dead Redemption 2 lean into the minutiae of frontier life; and Spider-Man embrace the urban jungle of New York City.

     

     

    The Shortlist:

     

    Assassin's Creed Odyssey

     

    God of War


    Red Dead Redemption 2

     

    Spider-Man

     

     

     

    The Winner:


    God of War

    Despite the stiff competition, God of War rose above all other contenders to claim the title of best action-adventure game of 2018. A re-imagining of the long-running and much-loved franchise, God of War brought the hack-and-slash series to new heights in terms of narrative, art direction, graphics, and character writing. The inclusion of open-world and role-playing game elements worked wonders, as did the inclusion of a helpful sidekick in Atreus. Overall these additions make the title deeper, more customizable, and more expansive. The future is bright for one of Sony's most essential properties.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/435107/best-action-adventure-game-of-2018/

  • scissors
    December 30th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    According to Japanese website Nifty, Japanese developer and publisher Level-5, known for series such as Professor Layton and Yokai Watch, has seen a mass exodus of employees in recent months that has left them without the manpower to finish some of their announced projects.

     

    This rumour would fit with the news that Yokai Watch 4 has been delayed from its initially announced 'winter 2018' release date to 'spring 2019', while Inazuma Eleven Ares was delayed past May 2019, presumably as the company hires new staff to finish these games.

    Although no reason was given for the exodus, the website does note that Yokai Watch 4 missing the holiday 2018 rush will undoubtedly have caused a number of lost sales for the company in terms of merchandise and toys.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/435113/rumour-mass-exodus-of-staff-at-level-5-has-caused-project-delays/

  • scissors
    December 28th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    The stealth game from publisher Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment and developer IO Interactive - Hitman 2 - sold 196,343 units in two days at retail, according to our estimates. First week sales can be viewed on the VGChartz Global Weekly Chart for the week ending November 17.

    Breaking down the sales by platform, the game sold best on the PlayStation 4 with 139,674 units sold (71%), compared to 56,669 units sold on the Xbox One (29%). 

     

    Breaking down the sales by region, the game sold best in the US with 82,968 units sold (42%), compared to 69,084 units sold in Europe (35%). Looking more closely at Europe, the game sold an estimated 14,148 units in the UK,  12,969 units in Germany, and 10,279 units in France.
     
    Hitman 2 released for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One and Windows PC worldwide on November 13.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/394197/hitman-2-sells-an-estimated-196343-units-first-week-at-retail/

  • scissors
    December 28th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    Publisher Dotemu and developer Lizardcube have released new screenshots for Streets of Rage 4.

    View them below:

     

    Thanks IGN.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/401962/streets-of-rage-4-screenshots-released/

  • scissors
    December 28th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    From Software president Hidetaka Miyazaki in an interview with 4Gamer.net revealed the company has two unannounced titles in development.


    "While it isn’t the time to discuss details, they’re both [From Software]-esque games," said Miyazaki. "We’ll need a little more time, but we’ll be able to tell everyone more about them once they take shape."

    Thanks Gematsu.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/401469/from-software-working-on-2-unannounced-titles/

  • scissors
    December 27th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    The online action RPG from publisher Bethesda Softworks and developer Bethesda Game Studios - Fallout 76 - sold 1,061,884  units in two days at retail, according to our estimates. First week sales can be viewed on the VGChartz Global Weekly Chart for the week ending November 17.

    Breaking down the sales by platform, the game sold best on the PlayStation 4 with 596,243 units sold (56%), compared to 335,472 units sold on the Xbox One (32%) and 130,169 units sold on Windows (12%)

     

    Breaking down the sales by region, the game sold best in the US with 477,006 units sold (45%), compared to 342,041 units sold in Europe (32%). Looking more closely at Europe, the game sold an estimated 85,740 units in the UK, 64,011 units in Germany, and 49,220 units in France.
     
    Here are how first week sales of Fallout 76 compare to other games in the franchise:
    1. Fallout 4 - 4.29 Million Units
    2. Fallout: New Vegas - 1.45 Million Units
    3. Fallout 76 - 1.06 Million Units
    4. Fallout 3 - 0.98 Million Units
    Fallout 76 released for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One and Windows PC worldwide on November 14.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/394146/fallout-76-sells-an-estimated-106-million-units-first-week-at-retail/

  • scissors
    December 27th, 2018GamespotUncategorized


    This is the first in a planned series called "Still the Best", where I compare older games against popular newcomers in the same genre.


    At New York Comic Con in October, minutes before the Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse panel was due to begin, the pre-panel emcee attempted to warm up the crowd with a simple question: which is better, Batman: Arkham or Marvel's Spider-Man? The crowd response was mixed—surprising, considering all the Spidey costumes at Madison Square Garden that day—with about half going for Rocksteady's Batman series and the remaining half opting for the web-slinging PS4 exclusive. I remained quiet, having played only the Arkham games. Now, a couple of months later, with Spider-Man under by belt, I can say confidently that Batman: Arkham—specifically, Arkham Asylum—is the superior game. In fact, nine years after the fact, Arkham Asylum remains the very best superhero game, Spider-Man's critical and commercial successes notwithstanding.

    I realize this will take some convincing. First, Asylum is not typically considered the best of the Arkham series—that honor goes to its open-world sequel Arkham City—so how could it possibly be the greatest superhero game? Second, Spider-Man is the flavor du jour, fresh in the minds of fans, and beloved for its admittedly excellent aerial locomotion, close-quarters combat, and suit customization options. Yet there is a case to be made for Asylum over all challengers, in terms of pacing, atmosphere, and general game structure. In short, the semi-linear Metroidvania structure of Batman: Arkham Asylum is superior in execution to the open-ended urban sandbox composition of its sequels and 2018's superhero darling.

    Arkham City and the Transition to Open-World

    What most people pinpoint as a positive transition—the movement away from semi-linear gameplay in Asylum to a full-blown open-world experience in City and its sequels—I identify as a step backwards. The series transformed in a couple of years from a lean, efficient, semi-structured action-adventure into a relatively formless sandbox game, with a lot of busy work and an abundance of so-called artificial game lengtheners. Now, that's not to say that an open-world experiment is inherently inferior. Rather, it's all about execution. In the case of Arkham Asylum and Arkham City, developer Rocksteady executed the former's interlocking hub-and-spoke layout more effectively than the latter's open-ended urban sprawl.

    By focusing on a single, smallish setting—the bleak, gothic Arkham Asylum—Rocksteady achieved wonders in story-telling (both verbal and non-verbal), setting, atmosphere, pacing, and, most importantly, gameplay. The asylum is a character in itself, claustrophobic and dynamic—revisiting locations across asylum grounds at different periods throughout the night reveals decay, graffiti, etc.—and a playground, sitting firmly in the Goldilocks zone between too linear and too amorphous, that allows guided progression, passive world-building, and the freedom to explore and backtrack with upgraded skills and devices should you as the player see fit. Rocksteady might have improved things mechanically and technically in City and its open-world follow-ups, but never again did it capture the focused fun of Asylum.

    Moreover, Asylum has a handful of unique boss encounters that help it rise above others in the Arkham canon, even if, admittedly, City boasts the best boss fight in the series: Mr. Freeze. In the grimy halls of Arkham Asylum, under the spell of Scarecrow's fear toxin, Batman must navigate his way through a series of obstacle courses set in a nightmare world. Later, in one of the most breathless and suspenseful episodes in modern gaming, the Dark Knight must move stealthily across flimsy, floating boards as a man-eating monster swims beneath the surface. 

    While Arkham City opened up the franchise, geographically and mechanically, it lost some of the intentionality of Asylum. Yes, its art direction and graphical horsepower are astounding; sure, its combat system and locomotion options clearly more evolved than its predecessor. Yet for all its good points, Mr. Freeze included, City delivers an uneven open-world adventure. Apart from its preposterous premise—don't get me started on Quincy Sharp's ascension to mayor or the city's acquiescence to an open-air maximum security prison in its backyard—the game suffers from something that infects many modern large-scale action games: bloat.

    City boasts more villains, more Riddler trophies—440, up from 240—more side-quests, more real estate, more everything, but comes up against an imbalance between meaningful activities and challenges and what amounts to inessential filler. Sure, there's an entire city at your wing tips, but much of it will simply be glided or mantled over unthinkingly, as players send the caped crusader back and forth among main mission points. Again, there's nothing wrong per se with extra content and space, but in order to be valuable it must be content worth absorbing, space worth exploring. In Arkham City, only sporadically is the actual city worth the effort.

    Spider-Man as the Heir Apparent

    Like it or not, fans and critics will forever compare Rocksteady's work with Arkham to Insomniac Games' Spider-Man. The former is the series that legitimized licensed superhero games and the latter its heir apparent. In that comparison, 2018's PlayStation 4 exclusive emerges the victor—at least in three out of four match-ups. While it might not outclass the game that started it all, Spider-Man stands as a superior sandbox experiment weighed against City and its sequels Arkham Knight and Arkham Origins (the latter developed not by Rocksteady but rather WB Games Montréal).

    It helps that Spider-Man as a hero makes more sense in an open-world environment. Whereas the small-scale stealth-action and problem-solving of Asylum is a great match for Batman—a mortal hero whose brain is arguably his greatest asset—the same cramped, cerebral setting would be a liability for Spider-Man. No, Spidey belongs in the spaces among skyscrapers.

    While Spider-Man comes closest to unseating Arkham Asylum, it ultimately fails to eclipse the more structured comic book caper. This is due in part to the game falling into open-world traps straight out of the Ubisoft playbook, and in part to some unforced errors of its own.

    Now, to be fair Insomniac's take on the superhero genre features several positive things (keep in mind I consider it the second-best of its kind). Apart from its deep, flexible suit customization options, which allow players to dress Spidey in almost 30 comic book and movie inspired costumes, the game boasts a more evolved, more aerial, more cinematic version of the combat framework Rocksteady crafted. The costumed webslinger moves across the ground, off buildings, and through empty space graciously and seamlessly, chaining together spectacular combos, firing off special web-based attacks, and interacting with environmental fixtures.

    This latter point is perhaps the game's most impressive feat. The coders at Insomniac worked miracles, in combat and in player locomotion, to make Spidey interact with the game world in the way you'd expect. A thrown post box cuts through the clutter of battle and hits its mark, a webbed bad guy sticks to the lamp post behind him, et cetera, et cetera. Rarely does a body fly off with no purpose; almost never does Spider-Man hit a wall and bounce off helplessly, breaking immersion. There's a theatricality to almost everything in Spider-Man.

    Of course, that mindfulness translates to the urban locomotion that won over so many fans in 2018. Swinging, crawling, wall-running, and falling across the high-rises of Manhattan is smooth and often joyful, mitigating—to a point—the thoughtless open-air traversal that bogs down so many sandbox adventures.

    Despite these marvelous mobility mechanics, moving above the city skyline can sometimes feel like a chore. Mission points often arrive far away from your current destination, encouraging you to swing miles across the urban jungle of New York City. Much of this feels designed to highlight the vastness of your urban environment or cynically to extend the game's length; rarely, at least after the first couple of hours, is it fun or meaningful. There isn't a pervasive sense of danger, or an abiding potential for discovery and exploration. There's plenty of side content along the way, sure, but like the early Assassin's Creed games, many of the side missions are tedious and duplicative.

    In fact, with its radio towers, busy work, and map cluttered with icons, Spider-Man on PS4 is very much an open-world throwback. Where modern games like The Witcher III, Breath of the Wild, and the other big 2018 PS4 exclusive God of War are making open-world experiences more about creative exploration and problem-solving, Insomniac's marquee title is, in the vein of last-gen adventures like Assassin's Creed and Sleeping Dogs, more about checking off a long to-do list.

    Spider-Man makes matters worse with several side-kick main missions, where players leave Spidey behind and control either Mary Jane Watson or Miles Morales in momentum-killing stealth/investigation sequences. The energetic pacing of the game slows to a crawl and players must embrace some tiresome trial-and-error stealth action. These episodes—which no one asked for—are the low point of what is, despite its adherence to an archaic open-world format, a near-great superhero game. 

    Final Thoughts

    Spider-Man is a promising first try for Insomniac. The combat system is deliriously fun, moving around Manhattan is almost uncannily intuitive, and there are suit options aplenty. A sequel, stripped of side-kick missions and featuring a more organic urban playground, might take the title "Best Superhero Game."

    For now, though, Batman: Arkham Asylum wears that crown. While it's less ambitious than its sequels and lacks the finesse of Spider-Man, its planful pacing, winning action-adventure formula, unique events, and controlled atmosphere make it a more complete, more satisfying video game.

     

    Thank you for reading. Please leave your thoughts and also any recommendations about other games and genres that might be featured in this series.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/393940/still-the-bestbatman-arkham-asylum/

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