XBox 360 Universe Straight from the source
  • scissors
    November 30th, 2016GamespotUncategorized

    ConcernedApe has announced in a blog post that its farming simulation title Stardew Valley, which took Steam by storm earlier this year, is finally releasing on consoles this December.

    It will first release in North America on PS4 on December 13th, before being available in the rest of the world and on Xbox One the following day.

     

    Unfortunately, the Wii U version has been cancelled, but the good news for prospective Nintendo Switch owners is that the game will be coming to Nintendo's upcoming platform. Developer ConcernedApe noted that "looking at Wii U and the current gaming landscape, we made the difficult choice to shift our development efforts to creating a version for Nintendo Switch."

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/266606/stardew-valley-launches-on-consoles-next-month-wii-u-version-cancelled/

  • scissors
    November 29th, 2016GamespotUncategorized

    Sources have told Polygon that a fourth entry in the fighting series Marvel vs Capcom is in development and will release on the PS4 in 2017.

    According to Polygon "[Capcom] will unveil Marvel vs. Capcom 4 this week alongside Sony’s PlayStation Experience event". Fans have been waiting for a new entry in the series since 2011, when Marvel vs. Capcom 3 released.

    The PlayStation Experience event takes place on December 3rd and 4th.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/266605/rumour-marvel-vs-capcom-4-coming-in-2017/

  • scissors
    November 28th, 2016GamespotUncategorized

    Pokémon Sun and Pokémon Moon technically did not top the UK charts in its opening week, according to Chart-Track for the week ending November 26. The games debuted in third and fourth, respectively. If you combine the sales it is the best-selling game in the UK for the week. 

    Pokémon Sun and  Pokémon Moon is the biggest opening in Nintendo history in the UK. The two games sold twice as much as Pokémon Omega Ruby and Pokémon Alpha Sapphire.

    FIFA 17 topped the charts as sales jumped 311 percent, followed by Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare in second with a 155 percent increase in sales. Battlefield 1 took the fifth spot as sales jumped 115 percent. Watch Dogs 2 sales increased five percent in its second week. Nearly every game in the top 40 saw sales increase due to Black Friday sales. 

    Here are the top 10 best-selling titles (combined sales) for the week:

    1. FIFA 17
    2. Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare
    3. Pokémon Sun 
    4. Pokémon Moon 
    5. Battlefield 1
    6. Watch Dogs 2
    7. Forza Horizon 3
    8. Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End 
    9. Grand Theft Auto V 
    10. Gears of War 4

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/266603/pokemon-sun-and-moon-best-selling-title-in-the-uk/

  • scissors
    November 28th, 2016GamespotUncategorized

    Sony had a strong Black Friday week in the UK. The PlayStation 4 had its biggest week since the console launched in 2013, according to Chart-Track for the week ending November 26.

     To compare, the PlayStation 4 sold 251,488 units in its opening week, according to VGChartz.

     

    Software sales for games on the PlayStation 4 were also strong. Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End, Driveclub and Ratchet & Clank all re-entered the charts as sales increased over 999 percent.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/266604/black-friday-was-the-biggest-ps4-week-in-the-uk-since-launch/

  • scissors
    November 28th, 2016GamespotUncategorized

    Sony announced all of the games that will be releasing this week on the PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, and PlayStation Vita in the US. 20 games in total will release this week.


    Here is the full list of games:

    • Aqua Moto Racing Utopia, PS4 — Digital
    • Arcade Archives Neo Geo Metal Slug, PS4 — Digital
    • Battalion Commander, PS4 — Digital 
    • Clockwork Tales: Of Glass and Ink, PS4 — Digital
    • The Crew Ultimate Edition, PS4 — Retail
    • Crystal Rift, PS4, PS VR — Digital
    • Destroy All Humans 2, PS4 — Digital
    • The Dwarves, PS4 — Digital, Retail
    • Final Fantasy XV, PS4 — Digital, Retail
    • How We Soar, PS4 — Digital
    • Hue, PS Vita — Digital
    • Industry Giant 2, PS4 — Digital 
    • The Keeper of 4 Elements, PS4, PS Vita — Digital
    • Neon Chrome, PS Vita — Digital
    • Pinball FX2 VR, PS VR — Digital
    • Rock ‘N Racing Off Road DX, PS4 — Digital
    • Space Overlords, PS4, PS Vita — Digital
    • Steep, PS4 — Digital, Retail
    • Steins;Gate 0, PS4, PS Vita — Digital, Retail
    • WinKings, PS4 — Digital

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/266602/new-playstation-releases-this-week-final-fantasy-xv-steep/

  • scissors
    November 28th, 2016GamespotUncategorized

    BlazBlue is not an easy series to get into. With so many sequels, enhanced editions, and spin-off media, it can be more than a little intimidating. It doesn't have the cachet of series like Street Fighter or Mortal Kombat. Yet it's a franchise equal - and in some cases superior - to those well-worn franchises. The latest (and perhaps last) game in the 2D fighting saga is BlazBlue: Central Fiction, the most feature-rich and balanced installment yet.

    Unlike many fighters which boast single player experiences that are basically glorified arcade modes, Central Fiction features a deep and captivating story mode that plays out like a season of an especially good anime. It's actually more visual novel than anything, with storylines and sub-plots carried over from previous installments. The story revolves around the Novus Orbis Librarium (NOL), a multi-national organization that monitors and, in some cases, suppresses dangerous sources of power.

    While the story in Central Fiction, which thankfully summarizes the events of the preceding three games for series newcomers, is one of the title's highlights, it is seriously convoluted, even for those who've been along for the ride since it started in 2008. With so many supporting characters and through-lines it can be difficult to make sense of the proceedings. Still, with hours of dialogue and lots of character development, the story mode is one of the game's strongest points, even if it's missing the English voice-overs of previous installments.

    In terms of gameplay, Central Fiction scores even more points. Many of the mechanics that define the series, including three-button attacks, horizontal and vertical mobility, and the "drive" system, return. New mechanics include "Exceed Accel," a super-move that deals huge damage, and "Active Flow," which rewards aggressive players with boosted damage and recovery. If it all sounds overwhelming, that's because it is. Luckily, Central Fiction includes a robust tutorial and an easy mode called "Stylish" for rookies.

    These additions might seem relatively minor, but they work well with what Central Fiction, and BlazBlue in general, are trying to accomplish: a balanced, competitive 2D fighter that discourages passive fighting techniques. The learning curve is steep, no doubt, but the rewards for mastering the complexity of the system are worthwhile.

    Apart from training and story modes, Central Fiction includes several other modes to keep players coming back. There's score attack; Speed Star mode, a take on time attack; and, best of all, Grim of Abyss. Similar in design to Onimusha's "Dark Realm," Grim of Abyss asks players to take down opposing fighters through multiple levels, strengthening their characters along the way.

    In addition to lots of challenge modes and gameplay tweaks, Central Fiction hosts 35 fighters (including unlockable and DLC characters), by far the most of any game in the series. One of the more interesting newcomers is Hibiki Kohaku, a NOL captain who fights with traps and duplicates of himself. Complementing Hibiki and the rest of the roster are some gorgeous musical tracks and amazingly drawn levels that look like something torn from Steamboy or Rintaro's Metropolis.

    BlazBlue might not be a household name, but it's one of the finest 2D fighting series on the market today. Central Fiction, ostensibly the last of the saga, is its best. With a huge cast of characters, several challenge modes, and deep, involving gameplay, it stands as a worthy addition to fighting fans' libraries. Patience is required to overcome an initial learning curve and a cheat sheet necessary to decode its mythology, but those willing to persevere will reap a nice reward.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/266579/blazblue-central-fiction-ps4/

  • scissors
    November 23rd, 2016GamespotUncategorized

    Although Halo creator Bungie and benefactor Microsoft collaborated on five successful games between 2001 and 2010, their relationship was far from perfect. In 2007, seven years after Microsoft had acquired Bungie and repurposed what would become Halo: Combat Evolved into a launch title, Bungie split from Microsoft Game Studios to become a privately held independent company. According to a deal between the two, the Halo intellectual property would belong to Microsoft.

    With Halo: Reach in the books and Bungie gone, Microsoft needed a new studio to take ownership of its most recognizable property. That studio was 343 Industries, named, ominously, after a duplicitous, untrustworthy character from the Halo series. 343 began work on Halo 4 in 2009 and released the title in 2012 as the first part of a new Halo trilogy.

    Although Halo 4 was a smash hit for Microsoft — it grossed $220 million on launch day and $300 million first week, setting a new record — it proved to be the worst and weakest entry in the Halo franchise, a game that strayed far from the series' successful staples. How and why 343 botched the development of Microsoft's most beloved property is a long and unfortunate story.

    Two things contributed to the mediocrity of Halo 4: the developers at 343 focusing resources on the wrong things, and their misguided belief that Halo needed "fixing." Before Halo 4, campaigns in Halo had sourced their strength from three main, interrelated items: open level design, cutthroat artificial intelligence, and improvisational gunplay. Yes, Halo campaigns during the Bungie era featured a number of linear corridor levels, but always there was a certain freedom of movement and tactics.

    Instead of building off of that foundation, 343 went in another direction, focusing intently on art direction, graphics, world-building, and storytelling. The result was a game gorgeous to watch and rich in backstory that nevertheless played poorly. Levels in Halo 4 are painfully linear; enemies are decidedly dumber than in previous installments; and the opportunities for spontaneity in enemy firefights relatively non-existent.

    Aggravating those problems was Bungie's insistence that the Halo formula needed significant tweaking. 343 brought in developers and programmers from over 25 "AAA" studios, many of whom disliked Halo. "We had people who were hired who hated Halo because of 'X'", said Frank O'Connor, former community evangelist for Bungie and current Halo franchise director. "But what that really meant was 'I feel like this game could be awesome because of 'Y input' that I'm going to bring into it.'"

    That "Y input" turned out to be a healthy dose of Call of Duty. For the campaign that meant more straightforward level design and an influx of scripted events and QTEs. For multiplayer, which was partially farmed out to Certain Affinity, that meant custom loadouts, ordnance drops (basically kill streaks), perks, and killcams. Bungie had flirted with loadouts specific to game type in Halo: Reach, but 343 went even further in Halo 4, offering up to players fully customizable loadouts.

    The result was a muddled, messy, unbalanced multiplayer mode that was neither Halo nor Call of Duty but rather an uncomfortable hybrid that failed as both a twitch and arena shooter. Consequently, the online community in Halo 4 began drying up several months after launch. Three years later, 343 would listen to fan feedback and make amends for its multiplayer failures in Halo 4. Its stewardship over single player, however, would only deteriorate in the years that followed.

    The new Halo trilogy continued in 2015 with Halo 5: Guardians. Set eight months after the events of Halo 4, Guardians follows two units: Blue Team and Fireteam Osiris. Shockingly, the campaign in Guardians is even worse than the one in 4. Learning nothing from the metaphysical meanderings and unexplained characters in its freshman effort, 343 doubled down on a vague, context-less story in Halo 5 that begins in media res and requires extra-curricular research, even for Halo veterans.

    Even more detrimental is the campaign's focus on co-op. Halo has featured co-op play since its 2001 debut, but never did it impinge on the solo experience. By shoehorning in co-op features to fit a particular narrative, 343 robbed Halo 5 of its strength as a single player adventure. It's not much fun babysitting three Spartan teammates who wander around aimlessly soaking up bullets. Making matters worse is Halo 5's lack of offline and split-screen options, a staple of Halo multiplayer going back to its origins.

    Luckily, the campaign failings in Halo 5 did not translate to competitive multiplayer. The game represents a true return to arena shooting. Loadouts, ordnance drops, and armor abilities are gone. Fixed weapon spawns are back. "A big part of it is just putting all players on an equal footing," said Executive Producer Josh Holmes. "Making sure there’s an equal playing field. [Creative Director] Tim [Longo]’s been very passionate about making sure every player has the same set of abilities that they can employ and use as tools on the battlefield."

    343 further enhanced multiplayer in Halo 5 with "Warzone," its single greatest contribution to the series. A twist on Battlefield's "Conquest" mode, Warzone is a 24-player, objective-based mode that incorporates some player vs. environment aspects. Although the action is diminished somewhat by a dubious "requisition" system, Warzone stands as a brave new entry for the long-running franchise.

    Although it fixed some of the self-inflicted wounds of Halo 4 and introduced in Warzone the biggest game-changer for the series since Forge, the staff at 343 Industries have been poor guardians of the Halo property, especially when compared to series starter Bungie.

    By emulating Call of Duty, focusing on world-building instead of game design, and eschewing local multiplayer options, 343 (and by extension Microsoft), have demonstrated either ignorance of or hostility towards what makes Halo great. Multiplayer in Halo 5 is however a step in the right direction; one that will hopefully be a stepping stone to a better all-round package in Halo 6.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/266519/the-rise-and-fall-of-halo-part-iii-guardians-of-the-galaxy/

  • scissors
    November 23rd, 2016GamespotUncategorized

    The RPG from Square Enix - World of Final Fantasy - sold 287,878 units first week at retail, according to our estimates. First week sales can be viewed on the VGChartz Global Weekly Chart for the week ending October 29.

    Breaking down the sales by platform, the game sold best on the PlayStation 4 with 182,166 units sold (63%), compared to 105,712 units sold on the PlayStation Vita (37%).


    Breaking down the sales by region, the game sold best in Japan with 102,132 units sold (35%), compared to 77,140 units sold in Europe (27%) and 67,955 units sold in the US (24%). Looking more closely at Europe, the game sold an estimated 11,693 units in the UK, 14,897 units in Germany, and 11,175 units in France.

    World of Final Fantasy released for the PlayStation 4 and PlayStation Vita in North America on October 25, in Japan on October 27 and in Europe on October 28.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/266601/world-of-final-fantasy-sells-an-estimated-288k-units-first-week-at-retail/

  • scissors
    November 23rd, 2016GamespotUncategorized

    The first-person shooter from Electronic Arts and Respawn Entertainment - Titanfall 2 - sold 385,499 units first week at retail, according to our estimates. First week sales can be viewed on the VGChartz Global Weekly Chart for the week ending October 29.

    Breaking down the sales by platform, the game sold best on the PlayStation 4 with 191,819 units sold (50%), compared to 173,007 units sold on the Xbox One (45%). The game also sold 20,673 units on Windows PC (5%).


    Breaking down the sales by region, the game sold best in the US with 184,999 units sold (48%), compared to 115,726 units sold in Europe (30%). It also sold 21,989 units in Japan. Looking more closely at Europe, the game sold an estimated 31,961 units in the UK, 18,571 units in Germany, and 17,378 units in France.

    Titanfall 2 released for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One and Windows PC worldwide on October 28.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/266600/titanfall-2-sells-an-estimated-385k-units-first-week-at-retail/

  • scissors
    November 23rd, 2016GamespotUncategorized

    The first-person shooter from Electronic Arts and Respawn Entertainment - Titanfall 2 - sold 385,499 units first week at retail, according to our estimates. First week sales can be viewed on the VGChartz Global Weekly Chart for the week ending October 29.

    Breaking down the sales by platform, the game sold best on the PlayStation 4 with 191,819 units sold (50%), compared to 173,007 units sold on the Xbox One (45%). The game also sold 20,673 units on Windows PC (5%).


    Breaking down the sales by region, the game sold best in the US with 184,999 units sold (48%), compared to 115,726 units sold in Europe (30%). It also sold units in Japan. Looking more closely at Europe, the game sold an estimated 31,961 units in the UK, 18,571 units in Germany, and 17,378 units in France.

    Titanfall 2 released for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One and Windows PC worldwide on October 28.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/266600/titanfall-2-sells-an-estimated-385k-units-first-week-in-the-west-at-retail/

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