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    October 31st, 2011JoystiqNews
    Earlier today, we brought you one brave admission of childhood trauma caused by a game you wouldn't normally think of as scary. Now, the Joystiq staff is chiming in with their own tales of games that, despite not being traditional "horror" games, still managed to inspire absolute horror.

    Let the nightmares of our collective youth entertain you! Happy Halloween!

    Continue reading Joystiq's favorite unintentionally scary games

    JoystiqJoystiq's favorite unintentionally scary games originally appeared on Joystiq on Mon, 31 Oct 2011 17:30:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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    October 31st, 2011JoystiqNews
    It turns out that at least 5 million gamers the world over are into Battlefield enough to purchase its latest iteration in the first week. That's according to "internal estimates" from EA, anyway, which also dubs it "the fastest-selling game in EA's history." Hoo-rah!

    Late last week, the publisher announced that the DICE-developed FPS had moved 10 million units of the game onto store shelves and noted, "sell-through is good and we are already receiving re-orders." One week later, and it looks like the sell-through was good enough to deplete half of the original shipments. Virtual vehicle repair shops are also doing record business, as 67 million vehicles have already been destroyed in-game. Sometimes that repair tool just doesn't cut it, you know?

    JoystiqBattlefield 3 internal sales estimates show 5 million units sold in week one, globally originally appeared on Joystiq on Mon, 31 Oct 2011 16:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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    October 31st, 2011JoystiqNews

    If you have, in some Mr. Magoo like fashion, managed to stumble around the last ten years without playing the original Halo, this launch trailer for Halo Anniversary will spoil just about every major plot point. Everyone else: Enjoy.

    JoystiqHalo Anniversary promo trailer not for the uninitiated originally appeared on Joystiq on Mon, 31 Oct 2011 13:25:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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    October 31st, 2011JoystiqNews
    Those in the UK with a strong stomach may want to pick up the new issue of Play Magazine which features Volition team members testifying on the death of the now-defunct Red Faction series. Specifically, staffers like environmental artist Wayne Adams detail where series swan song Red Faction: Armageddon went wrong.

    "In the end hard decisions had to be made and what could have been was restructured into what the team could do with the amount of time they had," Adams told the magazine. "I can't say whether or not the original ideas would have been better but I think consistency was lost in all of the turmoil of change."

    We're sure the full article is equally interesting/depressing and, after all, if Halloween isn't the day to visit the scene of the grisly murder of a franchise, what is?

    JoystiqVolition staffer: Red Faction: Armageddon's problem was 'consistency' originally appeared on Joystiq on Mon, 31 Oct 2011 12:25:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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    October 31st, 2011GamespotPreviews

    Say hello to pawns, the customisable companion characters shared online in the fantasy role-playing game Dragon's Dogma.

     

    One great thing about making a fantasy game, according to Dragon's Dogma producer Hiroyuki Kobayashi, is that you don't have to explain your terms. Thanks to the universal language of classic fantasy lore, everyone knows what to expect of a mage (wears robes, casts spells) or a dragon (is big, breathes fire). It's a good jumping-off point for a role-playing game. "It's really easy to get into a world like this when it's such a universal concept," says Kobayashi of the setting of Dragon's Dogma: a big, open, Tolkienesque world of sword and sorcery.

    [ Watch Video ]

    Dragon's Dogma pawns trailer: discover the pawn legion.

    Into that world of fantasy genre tropes, Dragon's Dogma brings an original gambit: customisable companion characters called pawns, of which three form the party that follow you around and into battle. Your primary companion character, your main pawn, accompanies you through the whole game. You create him or her in the same way you customise your player character, in a deep, multi-slider character generator, teeming with all the hairstyle options, face and build variables, limb types, tattoos, and skin colours an obsessive amateur character designer could crave. You also select a class for your main pawn and establish their personality by completing a short questionnaire on their behalf. Personality governs your pawn's general AI-driven behaviour in combat.

    So far, so what, but here's the hook: the other two pawns aren't created by you but are downloaded from your friends' games. They are the main pawns of other players around the world and can be swapped in and out as you go, letting you pick the right mix of classes for the task at hand. It's a curious online feature--a taste of intersecting gameworlds in an essentially single-player, offline game. We look forward to recruiting the custom abominations of friends who can't take a character creator seriously. If you're playing entirely offline, there is a set of premade pawns to select from.

    More than just an online gimmick, pawns are "integral to the story," says Kobayashi-san. Pawns aren't actually human. Though they look and speak like normal people, they have no will of their own--hence all the following you around and doing your bidding. We're told to expect the mysterious origins of the "pawn legion," as well as the reason the pawns will do only your bidding, to become clear over time. Dollars to donuts it has to do with the way your character's story begins: a dragon attacks their sleepy coastal village, plucks out and eats their heart, leaving them improbably alive and with a magic glowing chest scar. The first pawn we encountered, when he popped out of a sudden vortex in the sky, presented a similarly glowing scar on his hand.

    So begins Dragon's Dogma, with your newly heartless player character jogging the narrow streets of the village, hitting up locals for quests (fetch this book, deliver this message). In our hands-off presentation of the game, we were skipped ahead, full party of pawns in tow, to a rumble with a stone golem in a rocky valley. Here, Dragon's Dogma showed its colours as an action RPG, with the player character, a magic archer, painting targeting reticles on the big stone beastie and firing away, and the main pawn, a warrior, in support. The two pawns, a mage and a second magic archer, brought up the rear, with the mage chanting healing spells from a safe distance. When the golem was stunned, the whole party piled on, scaling the stone giant to hack at its glowing purple weak spots.

    Pawns are on the chatty side in combat, letting you know what they're doing at all times ("I'll scale it and strike from above"), though you can also issue them general orders (attack, fall back) with the directional pad. In our demo, the pawns' AI-powered instincts for self-preservation weren't enough to keep them alive through the long golem fight (that or their player-defined personalities were given to recklessness), but fallen pawns can be revived in battle by the player character.

    The game stretches across "a good-sized peninsula, about 40 square kilometres," with fast travel to previously visited locations enabled by a ferrystone item, and it's fully explorable; beyond the golem's valley, a castle loomed invitingly on the horizon. Though the scenery is pleasant and the gameworld extensive, it'll take more than good looks and long walks to set apart a fantasy RPG such as Dragon's Dogma. The benefit of a fantasy setting might be universality, but it comes with competition aplenty. Dragon's Dogma's player-created and shareable pawn characters might just do the trick. We look forward to finding out.

    Read and Post Comments | Get the full article at GameSpot


    "Dragon's Dogma: Meet the Pawns" was posted by Jane Douglas on Mon, 31 Oct 2011 10:00:37 -0700
  • scissors
    October 31st, 2011GamespotPreviews

    Say hello to pawns, the customisable companion characters shared online in the fantasy role-playing game Dragon's Dogma.

     

    One great thing about making a fantasy game, according to Dragon's Dogma producer Hiroyuki Kobayashi, is that you don't have to explain your terms. Thanks to the universal language of classic fantasy lore, everyone knows what to expect of a mage (wears robes, casts spells) or a dragon (is big, breathes fire). It's a good jumping-off point for a role-playing game. "It's really easy to get into a world like this when it's such a universal concept," says Kobayashi of the setting of Dragon's Dogma: a big, open, Tolkienesque world of sword and sorcery.

    [ Watch Video ]

    Dragon's Dogma pawns trailer: discover the pawn legion.

    Into that world of fantasy genre tropes, Dragon's Dogma brings an original gambit: customisable companion characters called pawns, of which three form the party that follow you around and into battle. Your primary companion character, your main pawn, accompanies you through the whole game. You create him or her in the same way you customise your player character, in a deep, multi-slider character generator, teeming with all the hairstyle options, face and build variables, limb types, tattoos, and skin colours an obsessive amateur character designer could crave. You also select a class for your main pawn and establish their personality by completing a short questionnaire on their behalf. Personality governs your pawn's general AI-driven behaviour in combat.

    So far, so what, but here's the hook: the other two pawns aren't created by you but are downloaded from your friends' games. They are the main pawns of other players around the world and can be swapped in and out as you go, letting you pick the right mix of classes for the task at hand. It's a curious online feature--a taste of intersecting gameworlds in an essentially single-player, offline game. We look forward to recruiting the custom abominations of friends who can't take a character creator seriously. If you're playing entirely offline, there is a set of premade pawns to select from.

    More than just an online gimmick, pawns are "integral to the story," says Kobayashi-san. Pawns aren't actually human. Though they look and speak like normal people, they have no will of their own--hence all the following you around and doing your bidding. We're told to expect the mysterious origins of the "pawn legion," as well as the reason the pawns will do only your bidding, to become clear over time. Dollars to donuts it has to do with the way your character's story begins: a dragon attacks their sleepy coastal village, plucks out and eats their heart, leaving them improbably alive and with a magic glowing chest scar. The first pawn we encountered, when he popped out of a sudden vortex in the sky, presented a similarly glowing scar on his hand.

    So begins Dragon's Dogma, with your newly heartless player character jogging the narrow streets of the village, hitting up locals for quests (fetch this book, deliver this message). In our hands-off presentation of the game, we were skipped ahead, full party of pawns in tow, to a rumble with a stone golem in a rocky valley. Here, Dragon's Dogma showed its colours as an action RPG, with the player character, a magic archer, painting targeting reticles on the big stone beastie and firing away, and the main pawn, a warrior, in support. The two pawns, a mage and a second magic archer, brought up the rear, with the mage chanting healing spells from a safe distance. When the golem was stunned, the whole party piled on, scaling the stone giant to hack at its glowing purple weak spots.

    Pawns are on the chatty side in combat, letting you know what they're doing at all times ("I'll scale it and strike from above"), though you can also issue them general orders (attack, fall back) with the directional pad. In our demo, the pawns' AI-powered instincts for self-preservation weren't enough to keep them alive through the long golem fight (that or their player-defined personalities were given to recklessness), but fallen pawns can be revived in battle by the player character.

    The game stretches across "a good-sized peninsula, about 40 square kilometres," with fast travel to previously visited locations enabled by a ferrystone item, and it's fully explorable; beyond the golem's valley, a castle loomed invitingly on the horizon. Though the scenery is pleasant and the gameworld extensive, it'll take more than good looks and long walks to set apart a fantasy RPG such as Dragon's Dogma. The benefit of a fantasy setting might be universality, but it comes with competition aplenty. Dragon's Dogma's player-created and shareable pawn characters might just do the trick. We look forward to finding out.

    Read and Post Comments | Get the full article at GameSpot


    "Dragon's Dogma: Meet the Pawns" was posted by Jane Douglas on Mon, 31 Oct 2011 10:00:37 -0700
  • scissors
    October 31st, 2011GamespotPreviews

    Say hello to pawns, the customisable companion characters shared online in the fantasy role-playing game Dragon's Dogma.

     

    One great thing about making a fantasy game, according to Dragon's Dogma producer Hiroyuki Kobayashi, is that you don't have to explain your terms. Thanks to the universal language of classic fantasy lore, everyone knows what to expect of a mage (wears robes, casts spells) or a dragon (is big, breathes fire). It's a good jumping-off point for a role-playing game. "It's really easy to get into a world like this when it's such a universal concept," says Kobayashi of the setting of Dragon's Dogma: a big, open, Tolkienesque world of sword and sorcery.

    [ Watch Video ]

    Dragon's Dogma pawns trailer: discover the pawn legion.

    Into that world of fantasy genre tropes, Dragon's Dogma brings an original gambit: customisable companion characters called pawns, of which three form the party that follow you around and into battle. Your primary companion character, your main pawn, accompanies you through the whole game. You create him or her in the same way you customise your player character, in a deep, multi-slider character generator, teeming with all the hairstyle options, face and build variables, limb types, tattoos, and skin colours an obsessive amateur character designer could crave. You also select a class for your main pawn and establish their personality by completing a short questionnaire on their behalf. Personality governs your pawn's general AI-driven behaviour in combat.

    So far, so what, but here's the hook: the other two pawns aren't created by you but are downloaded from your friends' games. They are the main pawns of other players around the world and can be swapped in and out as you go, letting you pick the right mix of classes for the task at hand. It's a curious online feature--a taste of intersecting gameworlds in an essentially single-player, offline game. We look forward to recruiting the custom abominations of friends who can't take a character creator seriously. If you're playing entirely offline, there is a set of premade pawns to select from.

    More than just an online gimmick, pawns are "integral to the story," says Kobayashi-san. Pawns aren't actually human. Though they look and speak like normal people, they have no will of their own--hence all the following you around and doing your bidding. We're told to expect the mysterious origins of the "pawn legion," as well as the reason the pawns will do only your bidding, to become clear over time. Dollars to donuts it has to do with the way your character's story begins: a dragon attacks their sleepy coastal village, plucks out and eats their heart, leaving them improbably alive and with a magic glowing chest scar. The first pawn we encountered, when he popped out of a sudden vortex in the sky, presented a similarly glowing scar on his hand.

    So begins Dragon's Dogma, with your newly heartless player character jogging the narrow streets of the village, hitting up locals for quests (fetch this book, deliver this message). In our hands-off presentation of the game, we were skipped ahead, full party of pawns in tow, to a rumble with a stone golem in a rocky valley. Here, Dragon's Dogma showed its colours as an action RPG, with the player character, a magic archer, painting targeting reticles on the big stone beastie and firing away, and the main pawn, a warrior, in support. The two pawns, a mage and a second magic archer, brought up the rear, with the mage chanting healing spells from a safe distance. When the golem was stunned, the whole party piled on, scaling the stone giant to hack at its glowing purple weak spots.

    Pawns are on the chatty side in combat, letting you know what they're doing at all times ("I'll scale it and strike from above"), though you can also issue them general orders (attack, fall back) with the directional pad. In our demo, the pawns' AI-powered instincts for self-preservation weren't enough to keep them alive through the long golem fight (that or their player-defined personalities were given to recklessness), but fallen pawns can be revived in battle by the player character.

    The game stretches across "a good-sized peninsula, about 40 square kilometres," with fast travel to previously visited locations enabled by a ferrystone item, and it's fully explorable; beyond the golem's valley, a castle loomed invitingly on the horizon. Though the scenery is pleasant and the gameworld extensive, it'll take more than good looks and long walks to set apart a fantasy RPG such as Dragon's Dogma. The benefit of a fantasy setting might be universality, but it comes with competition aplenty. Dragon's Dogma's player-created and shareable pawn characters might just do the trick. We look forward to finding out.

    Read and Post Comments | Get the full article at GameSpot


    "Dragon's Dogma: Meet the Pawns" was posted by Jane Douglas on Mon, 31 Oct 2011 10:00:37 -0700
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    October 31st, 2011JoystiqNews

    Namco has posted a very long video discussing the features in Soulcalibur 5, complete with plenty of footage of everyone's favorite assassin, Ezio Auditore da Firenze. There's also a lot of talking to get through, so you may want to skip to 26:55 (as in the twenty-six minute mark) to get to the in-game action. Oh, and yes, Ezio brought his hidden gun.

    Siliconera notes that the video discusses the game's customization systems. Adjusting a character's physique, for example, could allow for longer reach. Furthermore, Namco does have plans for downloadable content, though the developers weren't ready to discuss whether those plans include more characters. We've still got our fingers crossed for Spawn making a glorious comeback.

    JoystiqEzio brings a hidden gun to a knife fight in Soulcalibur 5 footage originally appeared on Joystiq on Mon, 31 Oct 2011 11:55:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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    October 31st, 2011JoystiqNews

    Capcom's upcoming fantasy role-playing game Dragon's Dogma isn't interesting at all. It might not even be good.

    Writers in the gaming press have a tendency to go easy on in-development games. Readers love jumping to conspiracy-theory conclusions about our positivity but, the truth is, we want games to be good and interesting just as much as you do. And so we give them the benefit of the doubt when we write our previews. So what's different with Dragon's Dogma?

    Continue reading Breaking down Capcom's Dragon's Dogma press demo

    JoystiqBreaking down Capcom's Dragon's Dogma press demo originally appeared on Joystiq on Mon, 31 Oct 2011 11:20:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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    October 31st, 2011JoystiqNews

    When a video game trailer starts with a mohawked guy getting cut clean down the middle of his body, and surviving, you know it's a Suda 51 work. And from both of those facts, you can expect the rest of the trailer to be a weird experience, which this Lollipop Chainsaw clip certainly is.

    For example, in one scene, Juliet cuts a zombie's head off in the gym, causing the undead head to fly into the basketball hoop. That's the kind of thing WB is calling "total awesomeness" -- we think we'd want that kind of praise too if we'd managed to pull off a stunt like that.

    JoystiqLollipop Chainsaw's 'total awesomeness' on display originally appeared on Joystiq on Mon, 31 Oct 2011 10:45:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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