XBox 360 Universe

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  • scissors
    October 21st, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    11 Bit Studios brings its bleak and frozen city-building/survival game to consoles, with all its micromanagement glory. Frostpunk: Console Edition is a fantastic port of its PC counterpart with well-thought-out controls, as well as a clean and simple UI. Survival won’t come easy in the frigid crater you call home, though, where difficult moral decisions are as crucial to survival as resource collection and management. Better get the generator running, it’s a cold one out there.

    Full disclosure, I haven’t played Frostpunk on the PC. In fact, I’m not even that huge a fan of the genre. Though I do get off on min/maxing and mid-level micromanagement minutia, so I was curious to see what this game was all about, now that it has arrived on consoles. Having said that, Frostpunk felt more like a demanding stressful job than a challenging trek through the snow-covered wasteland. There’s a lot going on here, and it’s all thrust upon you fairly quickly, with little in the way of instructions.

    Be forewarned, Frostpunk is meant to be an uphill battle. You start with nothing and in the worst of conditions, all the while the cold eats away at your morale and your resources. You're supposed to feel like there is no hope, and right when you think you might just make it, something happens to throw the camp into utter disarray, returning your spirits to “dashed and despondent.” I get that’s the narrative being told here, but the pressure shouldn’t outweigh the play.

    After selecting the main story mission - 'A New Home' - a somber and chilling narration gets you up to speed on the world as it stands today. Humanity is all but lost. Snow covers every visible surface. Warmth is a distant memory. The sting of sub-zero temps is all you know now. Neither wealth nor class can save you from the unrelenting icy grip of the cold, and all things humanity once believed in are quickly abandoned to adapt and survive. Having set off north, hope is the only thing that drives you to a suitable location to build the last city on Earth.

    So begins your crisis management simulation. Starting with a group of 80 survivors you must turn this frozen barren crater into a life-sustaining, well-oiled machine. Initially, your job is to get the generator running for heat. This is done by collecting coal, either by claiming it from the very limited nearby supply, mining for it, or burning your wood and turning it into coal, with more options becoming available later on.

    Then you’ll need to provide shelter, which at first comes by way of tents (not great for warmth or comfort). They are cheap to create however, so you can make plenty, just don’t plan on that working for long. Later down the road you can research “houses” which will make life much easier…assuming you live long enough to utilize that upgrade.

    Food procurement is next on the docket. All this “last city on Earth” building works up quite the appetite, after all. In the beginning, most of your diet revolves around raw food gathered by hunters. As the game progresses you can turn raw food into standard rations and learn new recipes (like soup), which allow you to stretch your supplies.

    As issues arise, you're given tasks to complete in a few different ways. As an example, when building shelter, a task is brought to you to choose one of three options. 1) A pacifying option of providing “some shelter”, giving you 2 days to provide shelter for 40 people. Completing this task in the allotted time grants Hope (a key factor in your community). 2) You can opt to “provide shelter for everyone.” This task is harder to achieve, but you’ll be granted more Hope as a result. 3) Finally, you can choose to simply “not deal with the issue” at all. This will raise Discontent though (the other key factor in your community).

    Hope and Discontent are the two temperaments your community will need your help managing. Every choice you make will factor in to whether the social stability rises or falls. Find some survivors outside the crater with one of your scouts? Hope will rise. Having your guards patrol the streets will create a sense of safety. Hope will rise. On the other hand, if you don’t gather enough coal to keep the generator running, people will get cold. Discontent will rise. There could be too many mouths to feed, and instead of standard rations you have to add sawdust to the half-portion soup. Discontent will rise. Maybe your scouts reach a nearby settlement outside the crater and it’s completely abandoned. Word spreads back at camp that you're alone and no other colonies exist. Despair sets in, and, you guessed it, Discontent will rise. 

    This system keeps the pressure on at all times to manage how you deal with your people. If Discontent gets extremely high, people will try and revolt or leave the community altogether. Likewise if Hope falls too low.

    There are three major components affecting gameplay at all times, aside from the punishing cold. First are scouts. Scouts can be sent out into the frozen wilds to investigate nearby points of interest. It will take time for scouts to arrive at a given location, usually ranging from a few hours up to a few days. Once there, exploring will result in gained resources, survivors, and/or a new further location to travel to. The catch is, all resources remain with the scout until he returns to base, adding an element of risk to the operation. If your scout is killed out there, all resources are lost with it. If you send him to base, you lose the time it takes to travel home and back out to the last spot you unveiled. Scouting is unexpectedly satisfying and rewarding, making the world feel bigger than it is and giving a sense of hope that something good may come from every new expedition.

    The Tech Tree allows you to research one improvement at a time and it’s broken up into four categories: Heating, Exploration & Industry, Resources, and Food/Health/Shelter. Improvements like “Generator Power Upgrade 1” raise temps in all heat zones by 1 level, while “Lighter Scout Sleds” make scouts move 50% faster. Prioritizing your improvements is critical for a successful run.

    Lastly, the Book of Laws brings much needed rules and direction to the city. It's comprised of two trees: Adaptation and Purpose. Adaptation Laws are the first set available and they provide options like Emergency Shift, which allows you to force workers to work for the next 24hours, and Alternative Food Source, which allows you to eat corpses as Raw Food. Each option usually has pros and cons associated with it, so choose wisely.

    The Purpose tree splits into two paths: Order or Faith. Choosing one locks out the other. During my playthrough I chose Order, and by the end game I was executing people to keep the city under my thumb! Yeah, it got pretty out of hand out there. Survival will do that to you.

    The visual fidelity looked fine, though with the drab environment, and all structures looking so similar, I did find it difficult to pick out buildings at a glance. Granted, spending enough time with my city enabled me to locate things from memory fairly easily.

    The console controls are designed so well that it feels like the game was always meant to be on consoles. The directional buttons allow you to control time: Slower, Faster, Pause, and Start. L2 brings up a radial menu with all options a simple button press away and tabbing through categories is responsive and snappy. The UI is kept clean and minimal, and yet I always had the necessary information on hand without having to search for it. Analog sticks can pan, zoom, and rotate the camera, all of which felt natural and is set at just the right speed, no tweaking required. The trac-pad displays the thermal projection, showing you exactly where the majority of people are freezing to death.

    Something I didn’t care for was not being able to upgrade my structures once I learned an improved version. Having a city filled with tents that all need upgrading to houses meant deconstructing each tent individually, waiting for workers to complete that task, then choosing to build a house, and waiting for workers to complete the task. A simple option to “upgrade” would have been most welcome. Also, when facilities acquire abilities, each requiring a cooldown period, there's no visual or audio cue to indicate the ability is ready to use again. This results in needless and obsessive monitoring.

    Frostpunk: Console Edition is a brutal game where every choice comes at a price. Tight controls, clean UI, and no noticeable frame rate issues proves that a click-heavy mouse and keyboard game can work great on consoles. With Endless Mode and all DLC scenarios included, you'll more than get your money’s worth at a $30 price tag. Make no mistake, though, this game is cold, in every sense of the word. Good luck out there.

     

    Jacob James grew up in the golden era of 8- and 16-bit games, forever shaping and molding him as a life-long gamer. Some favorites include: Secret of Mana, Chrono Trigger, Final Fantasy and Super Mario RPG. Jacob graduated FullSail University with a degree in Computer Animation, so he has a working knowledge and understanding of what it takes to make these imaginative and immersive games he spends so much time playing and reviewing. You can follow him at www.LiveLootLevel.com

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440964/frostpunk-console-edition-ps4/

  • scissors
    October 20th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    The VGChartz Gap charts are updated monthly and each article focuses on a different gap chart. The charts include comparisons between the 7th generation and 8th generation platforms, as well as comparisons within the 8th generation. All sales are worldwide, unless otherwise stated.

    Switch Vs. 3DS Global:

    Gap change in latest month: 256,837 - Switch

    Gap change over last 12 months: 5,080,202 - Switch

    Total Lead: 6,141,915 – Switch

    Switch Total Sales: 38,751,874

    3DS Total Sales: 32,609,959

    September 2019 is the 31st month that the Nintendo Switch has been available for. During the latest month the gap grew in favor of the Switch by 256,837 units when compared to the 3DS during the same timeframe and by 5.08 million units in favor of the Switch in the last 12 months. The Switch is currently ahead of the 3DS by 6.14 million units.

    The 3DS launched in February 2011 (however, 3DS sales have been aligned to March 2011, since it only launched at the end of February in Japan), while the Nintendo Switch launched worldwide in March 2017. The Switch has sold 38.75 million units, while the 3DS sold 32.61 million units during the same timeframe.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/441000/switch-vs-3dsvgchartz-gap-chartsseptember-2019/

  • scissors
    October 20th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    Among fans, the sixth Star Trek film is often called Star Trek VI: The Apology, as it returned to form after the much-maligned Star Trek V. In the same way, Trine 4: The Nightmare Prince is a make-up call for Trine 3, the shortest and poorest entry in the original trilogy. By returning to the series' 2.5D roots, smoothing out any rough edges, enhancing combat—for a decade the weakest link in the Trine chain—and sporting gorgeous art and lovely music, Trine 4 delivers exactly what the ten-year-old puzzle-platform franchise needed. It's also the best Trine game yet, although not without a few minor faults.

    Trine 4 once again reunites Amadeus, Pontius, and Zoya, the three unlikely—or, perhaps after four games, likely—heroes who discovered the power of the Trine many moons ago. This time, the Astral Academy, a wizarding university, has requested the threesome's skills in locating and returning a wayward prince. Two years prior, the prince, Selius, was overcome by dark magic and sent for safekeeping to the Academy. As the most reliable and famous heroes in the land, Amadeus, Pontius, and Zoya accept their mission to retrieve Selius and prevent the young man from manifesting his nightmares in the real world.

    The story in Trine 4 is a nice mix of nostalgia and new information. The three champions banter and joke among themselves—referencing Amadeus' fear of his wife, Pontius' dangerous appetite, and Zoya's proclivity toward theft—but also encounter new lands and new NPCs. Selius himself, part victim and part villain, is a fine addition to the character roster. He serves as the MacGuffin, sure, but also challenges the heroic troika and reveals their personalities under duress.

    Outside of the main storyline, Trine 4 operates according to the rules of the first two Trine games. It's a side-scrolling 2.5D puzzle-platform game where three heroes with unique skills solve physics-based puzzles and on occasion fight off monsters. In single-player mode, one player swaps among Amadeus, Pontius, and Zoya. In "classic" multiplayer, three players take on the role of their favorite hero. There's also an "unlimited" mode that supports up to four players simultaneously, where you can mix and match combinations of characters at will. All multiplayer features are available in offline and online modes, although the lack of voice chat online makes coordination unduly difficult.

    Perhaps the most brilliant element in Trine 4 is its dynamic-puzzle solving system, which tailors puzzle-solving situations to the number of players involved. A game played solo will be quite different from a game played with three or four players, as puzzles in each level are remixed to offer greater challenge and encourage teamwork when playing in multiplayer. It grants the already substantial game high replay value and provides rewarding experiences for solo players and co-op teams.

    Regardless of the number of players, Trine 4 starts with tutorial levels for each of the three playable characters and then throws you into the fantasy landscape of Trine. You'll visit snow-capped mountains, haunted mansions, swamps, forests, caverns, and even the home of a friendly badger. The levels are wonderfully diverse and surprisingly long—perhaps the slightest bit overlong. Inside each one are dozens of clever puzzles with many potential solutions. Developer Frozenbyte sets the stage, gives its players a set of tools, and invites them to improvise. Do you use Amadeus the wizard to stack magical boxes to reach a high platform, deploy Pontius the knight to ground pound through the wooden floor, or ask Zoya the thief to slice through a rope holding a drawbridge up; or maybe some combination of the three? Trine 4 is at its best when ingenious puzzle meets creative solution.

    The slow drip of new abilities makes late-game puzzles even more imaginative and devilish, and creates a sensation of character progression. As the champions of Trine defeat monsters they'll earn experience points that unlock skills. Amadeus, for example, will learn to summon steel balls, which all characters can use to cross dangerous floors; Pontius will earn a reflective shield, which redirects sunlight to open doors and defeat overgrown vines; and Zoya will gain access to the fairy rope, which grants objects weightless properties. 

    If the puzzles are the best part of Trine 4, then combat is its most flawed feature. Frozenbyte has made great strides in fighting—the studio has given Zoya and Amadeus more offensive tools and introduced new enemies with special moves—but this latest and greatest Trine game still suffers from weak combat scenarios and boss fights. At certain junctures in every level, Selius' nightmares will literally come to life and attack our heroes. The screen is locked and Amadeus, Pontius, and Zoya must vanquish every last monster before proceeding. With interesting new enemies like fire spiders, head-hunting hedgehogs, and demonic archers, combat is more varied than ever before, but it still, ultimately, boils down to a button-mashing affair. Technically, Zoya and Amadeus could fight, thanks to brand new offensive firepower, but Pontius' sword and shield are often enough to win the day.

    Boss fights are a similar story. Trine 4 boasts the best collection of bosses in the series, but they're still easy button-mashing endeavors. The final boss encounter is especially disappointing. Less dispiriting are three boss battles unique to each hero that play on their fears. Essentially nightmares given voice and form, these battles are excellent from a thematic point of view but not terribly engaging mechanically. They're also designed around one player and subsequently unimpressive in the context of co-op.

    Outside of puzzle-solving and combat, Trine 4 offers many opportunities for exploration off the main path. Hidden in each level are letters, artifacts, and components. Find enough components and you'll craft a new fixture or piece of furniture, which will then appear in the game's interactive home screen. Every stage also hides dozens of experience orbs, which allow players to enhance each character's abilities in a skill tree. While a neat addition, the skill tree adds little to the equation. You'll be able to breeze through the campaign without using your accumulated skill points.

    The Trine series is known for its creative problem-solving and secrets, but arguably its most recognized features are spectacular graphics and music. On this front, Trine 4 doesn't disappoint. This is one of the most lavishly-designed and gorgeous 2D titles of the generation, with jaw-dropping art direction, atmospheric lighting, and backgrounds bursting with hundreds of little details. Music, by Trine mainstay Ari Pulkkinen, is equally inspired. Pulkkinen's moody, magical tracks are, as always, an ideal complement for the enchanting visuals and storybook setting of the game.

    Trine 4 is the best game in the franchise, and a refreshing return to the series' roots after the ambitious-but-flawed third installment. It's as beautiful-looking and sounding as ever, it sports a dynamic puzzle system that conjures unique challenges for differently-sized parties, and it includes scores of clever puzzles with multiple outside-the-box solutions. Combat, while improved, prevents the game from realizing its potential, as do a superfluous skill tree and the lack of communication tools in online multiplayer. Even with these minor flaws, though, local co-op enthusiasts and puzzle-platform fans should scoop this one up.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440811/trine-4-the-nightmare-prince-ns/

  • scissors
    October 19th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    The VGChartz Gap charts are updated monthly and each article focuses on a different gap chart. The charts include comparisons between the 7th generation and 8th generation platforms, as well as comparisons within the 8th generation. All sales are worldwide, unless otherwise stated.

    Switch Vs. Wii Global:

    Gap change in latest month: 740,022 - NS

    Gap change over last 12 months: 4,211,313 - Wii

    Total Lead: 10,759,325 - Wii

    Switch Total Sales: 38,751,874

    Wii Total Sales: 49,511,199

    September 2019 is the 31st month that the Nintendo Switch has been available for. During the latest month the Switch caught up with the Wii by 740,022 units. In the last 12 months the Wii has outsold the Switch by 4.21 million units. The Wii is currently ahead of the Switch by 10.76 million units.

    The Wii launched in November 2006, while the Nintendo Switch launched in March 2017. The Switch has sold 38.75 million units, while the Wii sold 49.51 million units during the same timeframe.

    The 31st month for the Nintendo Switch is September 2019 and for the Wii it is May 2009.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440999/switch-vs-wiivgchartz-gap-chartsseptember-2019/

  • scissors
    October 19th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    Following a release of a render of the PlayStation 5 development kit an actual image of the console has apparently appeared online. YouTube channel ZONEofTECH in a new video has posted an image of the development kit.

    The dev kit for the PS5 features the same V shape that was seen in the render. V in Roman Numerals stand for the number five, so the shape could be a nod to the name of the console. 

    The top left of the front panel features the text "Prototype 1 Not For Sale." There also appears to be six USB ports, as well as an opening where a disc can be inserted.

    You can view the image of the PS5 development kit below:

     

     The PlayStation 5 will launch in Holiday 2020.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440986/image-of-the-playstation-5-dev-kit-reportedly-leaked/

  • scissors
    October 19th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    Nintendo announced all of the games that will be releasing next week on the Nintendo Switch. 28 games in total will release next week.

    Here is the full list of games:

    October 20

    • Tower Climb

    October 21

    • Monaco: Complete Edition

    October 22

    • Raging Loop
    • Day and Night
    • Tangle Tower
    • Skullgirls 2nd Encore
    • The Part
    • Street Outlaws: The List
    • PBA Pro Bowling
    • Destiny Connect: Tick-Tock Travelers
    • Mary Skelter 2

    October 24

    • Lethis - Path of Progress
    • Creepy Brawlers
    • Ghost Blade HD
    • 〇× LOGIC PUZZLE 1000 !
    • Cat Quest II
    • Dark Devotion
    • HAUNTED: Halloween '86
    • Dark Veer
    • Anthill
    • Winter Sports Games
    • Vortex Attack EX

    October 25

    • Into the Dead 2
    • Pixel Gladiator
    • Soul Searching
    • Pizza Bar Tycoon
    • Ultra Off-Road 2019: Alaska
    • Let's Sing Country

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440998/new-nintendo-releases-next-week-mary-skelter-2/

  • scissors
    October 19th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    Sony announced all of the games that will be releasing next week on the PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita and PlayStation VR in the US. 23 games in total will release next week.

    Here is the full list of games:

    October 21

    • Minotaur Arcade Vol. 1,PS VR, PS4 — Digital 

    October 22

    • Beholder 2, PS4 — Digital
    • Bonfire, PS VR — Digital
    • Deep Space Adventure, PS4, PS Vita — Digital (Cross-Buy)
    • Eastshade, PS4 — Digital
    • Horror Stories, PS4 — Digital
    • The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel III, PS4 — Digital, Retail
    • PBA Pro Bowling, PS4 — Digital
    • Raging Loop, PS4 — Digital
    • Street Outlaws: The List, PS4 — Digital, Retail
    • WWE 2K20, PS4 — Digital, Retail

    October 23

    • Battle Planet – Judgement Day, PS4 — Digital
    • Lonely Mountains: Downhill, PS4 — Digital
    • Lornsword Winter Chronicle, PS4 — Digital
    • Yoga Master, PS4 — Digital

    October 24

    • Call of Duty: Modern Warfare, PS4 — Digital, Retail
    • Cat Quest II, PS4 — Digital
    • Dark Devotion,PS4 — Digital 
    • Door Kickers: Action Squad, PS4 — Digital 
    October 25
    • Let’s Sing Country, PS4 — Digital, Retail
    • MediEvil, PS4 — Digital, Retail
    • The Outer Worlds, PS4 — Digital, Retail 
    • Robox, PS4 — Digital

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440997/new-playstation-releases-next-week-call-of-duty-modern-warfare-medievil-the-outer-worlds/

  • scissors
    October 19th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    Microsoft announced all of the games that will be releasing next week on the Xbox One in the US. 15 games in total will release next week.

    Here is the full list of games:

    October 21

    • Eastshade

    October 22

    • Farming Simulator 19 - Platinum Edition
    • WWE 2K20
    • Street Outlaws: The List
    • PBA Pro Bowling

    October 23

    • Deep Space Rush
    • Door Kickers: Action Squad
    • Lornswood Winter Chronicle
    • Caretaker Game
    • Lonely Mountains: Downhill

    October 24

    • Cat Quest II
    • Pixel Gladiator

    October 25

    • The Outer Worlds
    • Call of Duty: Modern Warfare
    • Let’s Sing Country

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440996/new-xbox-releases-next-week-call-of-duty-modern-warfare-the-outer-worlds/

  • scissors
    October 19th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    Aaron Greenberg, senior director for global product marketing at Xbox, speaking in the November issue of the Official Xbox Magazine discussed the next generation of consoles. He promised there will be a "big upgrade" when it comes to the CPU. 

    "But, with the next-gen, I think you’ll see a big upgrade in CPU, because we really want to make sure that you don’t have any compromises with the framerates," said Greenberg. "Yes, we can do 4K, but we can also do 120 frames per second. So I think that type of capability will be something that people don’t see today."


    The next generation consoles, Xbox Scarlett and PlayStation 5, will launch in Holiday 2020. The Xbox Scarlett will launch with Halo: Infinite

    Thanks GamingBolt.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440993/microsofts-aaron-greenberg-next-generation-will-see-a-big-upgrade-in-cpu/

  • scissors
    October 19th, 2019GamespotUncategorized

    ID@Xbox lead Agostino Simonetta speaking with GamesIndustry in an interview revealed that Xbox Game Pass subscribers are playing 40 percent more games. The figure includes games not on the Game Pass subscription service.

    "People that join the subscription are way more engaged," said Simonetta. "Well, they have a lot of free games to play -- but actually they're way more engaged outside the subscription. They go out to stores and buy more games than they did before they joined."

     

    Simonetta said that 91 percent of Xbox Game Pass subscribers have played a game they would not have tried without the service. Subscribers are playing 30 percent more genres than they did before joining. 

    "If you look at the video subscription service, you go in for the blockbuster and then you spend hours watching documentaries or stand-up comedy," he said.

    "We see Game Pass as an opportunity to broaden the horizon of the fans, so they're going to go and discover that, 'In ten years, I've never played a horror game, but guess what? I tried one and now I'm developing a taste for the genre.'"

    "For us, there's no genre that is not relevant because we really want to offer a great menu where customers can decide, 'You know what? I want to try something new,'" he added.


    The average usage for all titles in Xbox Game Pass has increased an average six times, revealed Simonetta.

    "We're seeing a massive spike in certain categories, but generally when a title goes into Game Pass, we see an average of six time increase in usage for all the games in the Xbox Game Pass catalogue," he said.

    "We're leading on subscription, developers are going on the journey with us and we're seeing them publicly commenting... the Afterparty team the other day said after seeing their game go on Game Pass day and date, suddenly they were seeing a lot of sales on other platforms. No More Robots said when Descenders went into Game Pass from Xbox Game Preview, they saw a positive impact on other platforms."

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/440992/xbox-game-pass-subscribers-are-playing-40-more-games/

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