XBox 360 Universe

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  • scissors
    February 18th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    Publisher Grey Box and developer Tequila Works announced it will release version 1.0.2 on the Nintendo Switch on Monday, February 19. 

     

    Read the complete patch notes for version 1.0.2 below:

    • Increased visual fidelity, bloom and post-processing
    • Sharpened image resolution
    • Opening Cinematics visually improved
    • Fixed possible stage exploits that would enable players to skip parts of the stages
    • Increased texture quality in specific areas
    • Increased view distance
    • Fixed an issue with foliage density, shadows, and render distances
    • Updated texture mipmaps for the Fox
    • Improved global mipmaps
    • Improved shadow distance and quality
    • Fixed instances of foliage pops
    • Stabilized FPS
    • Optimized the Boys cape and hair physics
    • Rebuilt streaming volumes
    • Fixed an issue that allowed you to see outside of the map in later stages.
    • Updated lighting to prevent bleed through
    • Updated the quality of trees in earlier stages where they would display poorly.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/272604/rime-update-102-coming-to-switch-on-february-19/

  • scissors
    February 18th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    Crazy Monkey Studios announced Guns, Gore & Cannoli 2 will launch for Windows PC via Steam on March 2. The developer also announced the game is also in development for the Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One.

    View the launch trailer below:

    Here is an overview of the game:

    Welcome to the 1940’s. Europe is being torn apart by the war, the USA is preparing for battle and the mob does business as usual. Only this time they went too far, even for Vinnie’s standards. 

    Prepare yourself to go to war after you make a shocking discovery about what actually happened during the end-stage of the Thugtown Massacre from Guns, Gore & Cannoli 1.

    Story
    1944, the war in Europe is entering its final stage. 15 years have passed since Vinnie survived the Thugtown Massacre. But now, some loose ends start crawling out of the past, dragging Vinnie as far as the European battlefield of World War 2. Find out who is chasing Vinnie around like a dog, turning all his friends into foes.

    Key features:

    Guns, Gore & Cannoli 2 continues the rich, engaging gangster story of the first game and includes all the fast paced action you’ve come to love, we made the best even better, with:

    • Upgraded character mobility - Vinnie has received a massive upgrade in his mobility features. 360 aiming, double jumping, kicking, jump-kicking, dodge rolls, somersaults, dual guns and a weapon wheel.

    • Campaign mode - Guns, Gore & Cannoli 2 features a full single or multiplayer campaign mode, packed with action, humor and animated cutscenes.

    • Rich environments - We pushed our artists to the limits to produce the best immersive, atmospheric backgrounds, smoothest animations, and coolest special effects, setting a new benchmark for 2D games. Look for opportunities to bring down walls, explode barrels, drop crates on top of enemies, blow up cars and even kick your enemies through doors. Enjoy watching the corpses of your enemies fly through the air like ragdolls after you blast them away with your rocket launcher.

    • Immersive world and period - Walk around in the European battlefields of World War 2. Every level of Guns, Gore & Cannoli breathes the 1940’s. Every inch of the game is like a picture straight from the second World War era. The cars, the furniture, the speakeasy clubs, the music, the propaganda posters, the streets and the weaponry reflect the turbulent time that the 1940’s were.

    • Online and local Co-op mode - You don’t want to die alone in the trenches? Well round up a platoon of 4 players and get blasting. Play as Vinnie in the solo campaign, or with up to 3 friends together while fighting through hordes of Nazis, zombies, monster, gangsters, cops, soldiers, tanks, submarines... in this all-new and incredibly fun arcade-style co-op action game. Teamwork is essential to surviving waves of enemy goons.

    • Humor - ‘War is hell’ unless you are Vinnie Cannoli and you turn every problem into a cynical joke, blurting out one-liners and snappy comments after a nice, juicy kill. Guns, Gore & Cannoli 2 will be a fun experience, not only to play but also to watch. Funny one-liners, screaming deaths, comical dialogs and hilarious enemies make you play this violent kill-simulator with a smirky grin on your face.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/272603/guns-gore-amp-cannoli-2-coming-to-pc-on-march-2-console-version-announced/

  • scissors
    February 18th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    The PlayStation Vita, somewhat like the PSP before it, suffered from a popularity imbalance. Despite being a niche product in western markets, it found a strong footing in its homeland of Japan, where lifestyles are better suited to handheld gaming. This approach has extended to mainline Asia, where the Vita has been somewhat of a success in places like Hong Kong and Singapore, maintaining a steady flow of releases and decent hardware sales.

    This has led to a window of opportunity for certain publishers. Japanese-developed titles make up the majority of the Vita's library but some of these have been unsuitable for western markets, often by virtue of some questionably lewd elements that wouldn't sit well with western rating boards. As a compromise, these publishers have been able to tap into the Asian market (where multiple countries have English as a dominant language) and release physical carts with English subtitles, which have rapidly become hugely popular on import sites like Play-Asia. In addition to these, some games which were digital-only in the west managed to get physical English releases in Asia, due to the stronger market there.

    It's these titles that I'll be looking at in this article - how the market originated, how it has flourished over the years, and where it's at currently. It's something that has grown with the console; I don't remember it being anywhere near as prevalent prior to the Vita's launch and as such it's easy to believe that the handheld played a big part in shaping the market into what it is today.

     

    2014 - The (Sword Art) Online Birth of the Asian-English Release

    The Asian-English market was (sort of) alive and well from the date of the Vita's launch in the region in 2011, where a number of titles like Disgaea and Uncharted were available alongside the brand new hardware. This is something that would continue throughout the console's life and isn't particularly worth noting here, as these games were generally available in physical English format in Europe and North America too.

    The first time the market truly offered something different was in 2012, with the launch of Dokuro. The 2D puzzle-platformer was released in Japan in July and on the same date an Asian release happened too, with English subtitles. It was basically a precursor to the digital western version which landed in October. A similar thing happened with Orgarhythm in August, which offered a physical cart in Asia that would play in English if your system was set to that language, but was only distributed digitally overseas by XSEED, making it a key early title early on which was popular with importers.

    There was then a long gap until the March 2014 release of the remastered Final Fantasy X games, which would become the next titles to follow this lead. In Japan, they'd released as two separate carts (one for X, one for X-2) but in the west it was announced that only X would be on the cart and X-2 would be a download code - not great news for anyone with a small memory card, or even those who just like to preserve their games. Enter the Asian-English release which had X-2 as its own cart, making it a perfect compromise for anyone unsatisfied with the product on offer in the west.

    This was just the first insight into the market, though, as Bandai-Namco would soon go one better in May with Sword Art Online: Hollow Fragment. The popular anime title was released in English a full three months before a western version was available, suggesting that the localization had been greenlit on the basis of prospective Asian sales alone. It was hugely popular among importers (despite the fact that it was hampered by an awful localization) and would be the first title to truly usher in the new era of games being translated for the Asian-English market thanks to its success (it shifted 400k copies worldwide).

    The rest of the year was made up of a fairly standard slate of titles that were already available from European and North American publishers, such as Senran Kagura: Shinovi Versus and Tales of Hearts R. There was one extra standout - Soul Sacrifice Delta, the expanded version of 2013's hunting action game, which landed digitally in the west but received a physical print in Asia. While Sony was winding down on the console, it was nice to see the publisher provide this option for gamers and is something that would be follow up on in 2015. It was clear that this was something other publishers were rapidly jumping on board with too.

     

    2015 - The Second Wave & an Ever-Increasing Market

    2015 would see a larger variety of titles making use of the Vita's popularity in Asia in this fashion; ones which were either digital-only in the west or only had very limited releases.

    The first noteworthy game of the year was HTOL#NIQ: The Firefly Diary, an artsy puzzle-platformer from Nippon Ichi Software that was localized by the overseas subsidiary NIS America, who only provided very low quantities of a Limited Edition in North America (and nothing in Europe, where it was digital-only). An Asian-English version therefore satisfied this gap in the market, even if it became obsolete a few years later when a dual-pack including Yomawari became available on the same cart.

    Other publishers began to make use of Asian-English publishing too. For example, Koei-Tecmo's Deception IV: The Nightmare Princess was a digital-only western affair despite its prequel Blood Ties being available at retail. Even Sony itself provided an Asian-English physical version of its fantastic JRPG Oreshika: Tainted Bloodlines, which has become a popular collector's item in recent years due to its rarity.

    Given Bandai-Namco's success with Sword Art Online, it was unsurprising to see other publishers quickly follow suit. Compile Heart's Moe Chronicle found its way across in May of 2015, although unlike SAO it didn't manage to find its way west at all due to heavy fanservice (although a 2017 Steam release managed to avoid ratings board requirements). Oddly, Sony appeared to have a hand in bringing this one across, something that was alleged to be happening again with its sequel Moero Crystal but this hasn't materialized as of the date of this article.

    The remaining months of the year would see three more games which were digital-only in the west receive Asian-English versions. The first of these was Resident Evil Revelations 2a port funded by Sony but published by Capcom (who had been largely absent on Vita throughout its life). The second was Samurai Warriors 4-II, which was somewhat of a surprise given that its prequel, Samurai Warriors 4, hadn't received the same treatment when it released in October of 2014. The third was Dynasty Warriors 8 Empires, the final mainline entry in the series available for Vita.

    Two last surprises were lined up for 2015, the first being Civilization Revolution 2 Plus from 2K Games, which was a shock for a number of reasons. The publisher had barely touched Vita previously and although it wasn't a surprise to see the title available in English (it was originally announced for Japan), it was noteworthy that Asia would be getting its own physical English print when it was only going to be available digitally in the west. Meanwhile, as with Moe Chronicle, Cygames' Airship Q saw an Asian-English only release in November, which offered a nice alternative to the digging and crafting of Terraria for importers, albeit with slightly less polish to the package.

    These marked a fantastic note to end the year on - the market had clearly grown and flourished in 2015, but it was 2016 that would be absolutely stellar.

     

    2016 - An Amazing Year for Importers

    By 2016, multiple publishers were making full use of the Asian-English market to not only release physical versions of games that were digital-only in the west, but also to localize titles which weren't seeing overseas releases at all.

    The year kicked off with the launch of Deemo: The Last Recital, a story-driven rhythm game from Rayark that had launched in Japan in the middle of 2015. At the time, it was the only English Vita version available, though the game later launched in North America and Europe thanks to PM Studios in 2017. The game itself was a decently fun time, although a little bit too grindy for me personally.

    February saw two major releases from Bandai-Namco - both were games which were available digitally in the west, but the only physical English copies were in Asia. The first of these was Digimon Story: Cyber Sleuth, which had also been ported to PS4, although the Vita version remained an impressive technical feat (which I personally enjoyed a lot when I played it). The second was Mobile Suit Gundam: Extreme Vs Force, the latest in the long-running Gundam Vs series that received a critical beating in Japan, although this was somewhat resolved for its English version. A western release of the latter didn't actually happen until July of 2017 (five whole months after the Asian-English version).

    By far the most noteworthy release of the year came in March with Dead or Alive Xtreme 3: VenusThe title courted minor controversy due to its content and Team Ninja quickly announced that it wouldn't be coming west at all due to concerns about the potential social implications of its message, making the Asian version the only possible way of playing in English. It seems like it was still successful though, as Play-Asia announced that the game had become its most pre-ordered title ever, breaking sales records for the retailer.

    In addition to Dead or Alive, it seems that other franchises weren't afraid to only target the Asian-English market too. Despite Extreme Vs Force seeing a western digital release in July, the next Gundam title - Breaker 3 - wasn't afforded the same opportunity, likely due to ongoing licensing issues with certain mechs in the game. In fact, this wasn't the only time that a Gundam title would exclusively see a release in Asia in 2017, as SD Gundam G Generation Genesis suffered the same fate in November and notably became the first (and only) Vita game with two game carts required for playing.

    The rest of the year was made up of the usual selection of titles already available from North American and European publishers such as Sword Art Online: Hollow Realization (which had now become a notable worldwide franchise for Bandai-Namco after Hollow Fragment's sales success). Two additional releases also stood out. A.W. Phoenix Festa was another anime tie-in without the same budget as the SAO games - it received a muted western reception but seemed to get a little more fanfare in Asia. Meanwhile Dragon Quest Builders was one of the Vita's stand-out titles of fall 2016, with a physical version that could only be found in Asia.

     

    2017 - Business as Usual

    At this point it was clear that, despite the Vita's relative failure in the west, the Asian-English market was successful enough for multiple publishers to jump on board. And not only were they serving the countries the games released in, but importers would often jump on these titles too. 2017 would continue these trends, although in slightly reduced capacity.

    The first release of the year was Super Robot Wars V in February, the latest in a long line of crossover strategy RPGs. The Vita had seen two Japan-only entries in 2014 and 2015, but from 2016 there seemed to have been a change of heart, with the PS3/PS4 entry Moon Dwellers getting an Asian-English version. This continued with V, which again never managed to find its way west, meaning importing was the only way to go (as with Moon Dwellers).

    In fact, 2017 would be a very busy year for Bandai-Namco as it had a further two releases during the early months of the year. The first of these was Accel World vs. Sword Art Online, the final in the SAO series on Vita and - just as it had started with Hollow Fragment - this was a title where the only physical English Vita version was available in Asia (an oddly fitting way to go out). The second was Gundam Breaker 3: Break Edition, one of only a handful of 'game-of-the-year' editions on Vita that included all the DLC on the cart.

    Outside of Bandai-Namco's efforts the year was quiet. Koei-Tecmo had now given up on Vita, but other publishers were entering the fray - notably eastasiasoft who took up the mantle of handling physical releases for a variety of indie games. Titles like Semispheres and Tachyon Project were on their slate, both of which were digital-only in the west. Arc System Works also picked up Nihon Falcom's classic action-RPG Ys Origin, which was a nice bonus for physical collectors (even if Limited Run Games had also picked up the game for an American release).

     

    2018 - This Train Isn't Stopping Yet!

    So with the current year well underway, where does that leave us with Asian-English games? Well, in short they still seem to be flowing like usual, even at this late stage in Vita's life. In fact even some new publishers are now joining in.

    The start of the year seems to have been a recap of previous successes - Digimon Story: Cyber Sleuth Hacker's Memory and Super Robot Wars X, both sequels to existing Vita games which got Asian-English versions, made up the significant titles for the first couple of months. Again, Digimon was digital-only in the west while Super Robot Wars seems to be a title that's remaining Asia-only, likely meaning it'll be popular with importers who enjoyed what V had to offer.

    In a surprise announcement, it was also revealed that we'd be getting Bullet Girls Phantasia - the latest in the popular clothes-ripping shooting franchise - from a partnership between D3 Publisher and H2 Interactive. Play-Asia seems to have been promoting the game heavily, suggesting the retailer expects it to be as successful as Dead or Alive Xtreme 3 was in 2016.

    Sadly, not every title got an Asian-English release that perhaps should have. Gintama Rumble, a hack 'n' slash take on the long-running anime/manga series developed by Tamsoft was announced for both PS4 & Vita in Japan, but an English version for Asia was announced only for PS4. It was a surprising omission given that the game was published by Bandai-Namco, which is clearly intending to support the Vita in the region throughout 2018.

    Still, overall 2018 looks to be another great year for importers and this is only from known titles - there's plenty of time for new games to be announced in the remaining months too.

     

    Conclusion

    Compared to how it was when the Vita launched in 2011, the Asian-English market of 2018 is a booming business, with multiple publishers investing in releasing titles either exclusively in the region or as the only physical versions available. A number of retailers now specialize in this area too, with shops like Buygame2,Heavy-Arm,Mariio128, and Play-Asia focusing on courting importers.

    It's hard to deny that Vita had a big hand in starting this. It was Bandai-Namco which took a gamble on Sword Art Online: Hollow Fragment back in 2014 that kicked it all off, with the Vita fanbase embracing this new method of game delivery and importing the title in droves, leading to some heavy investment in the market from Bandai-Namco which ultimately caused other publishers to follow suit. Throw in the ease of releasing physical versions in the region in general (meaning games were available on carts where they wouldn't be elsewhere) and you've got an area that continues to see success stories to this day.

    While the remainder of Vita's life is up in the air at this point thanks to the Switch's runaway success, I'm hopeful that the Asian-English market will provide a nice final bastion for physical collectors, as well provide us with a couple more surprises along the way. Companies like Kadokawa Games could leverage it to deliver physical versions of titles such as The Lost Child which are digital-only in the west, while questionably lewd games like Moero Pirates would make perfect sense to translate to English in the region for Compile Heart.

    No matter what happens, though, my collection of Vita game cases has been fantastically bolstered by the Asian-English market and I'm incredibly grateful for the future-proofing (and memory card space-saving) it has provided me with along the way.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/272598/a-look-back-at-the-birth-amp-rise-of-the-asian-english-market-on-vita/

  • scissors
    February 18th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    The upcoming New Game Plus mode for Xenoblade Chronicles 2 has been delayed from the middle of February to March 2, announced developer Monolith Soft. New Game Plus mode is apart of Update 1.3.0.

    The update was delayed due to a recent bug that was discovered. 

    Xenoblade Chronicles 2 is available now for the Nintendo Switch.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/272602/xenoblade-chronicles-2-new-game-plus-update-delayed-to-march-2/

  • scissors
    February 18th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    Red Hook Studios announced Darkest Dungeon will launch for the Xbox One on February 28. Pre-orders for the game will open on February 21. 

    For the first 60 days only Darkest Dungeon: Crimson Edition will be available for $24.99. It contains the base game and The Crimson Court DLC. That is a $10 discount. On April 29 the Crimson Edition will be removed from Xbox Live and the base game will be made available. 

    The Shieldbreaker DLC will be available for $3.99 at launch. 


    Here is the complete timeline for the Xbox One version of the game:

    Feb 21st:

    • Darkest Dungeon: Crimson Edition appears on XBOX LIVE for pre-order for $24.99

    Feb 28th:

    • Darkest Dungeon: Crimson Edition is playable! This edition will continue to be available for 60 days for the $24.99 price and will give access to the base game and The Crimson Court DLC
    • The Shieldbreaker DLC is available for purchase for $3.99

    April 29th:

    • Darkest Dungeon: Crimson Edition is removed from the store.
    • Darkest Dungeon base game appears on XBOX LIVE for purchase for $24.99
    • The Crimson Court DLC appears on XBOX LIVE for purchase $9.99
    • Darkest Dungeon: Ancestral Edition appears on XBOX LIVE for purchase $34.99, and includes the base game and both DLCs.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/272601/darkest-dungeon-coming-to-xbox-one-on-february-28/

  • scissors
    February 17th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    Sony announced all of the games that will be releasing this week on the PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita and PlayStation VR in the US. 19 games in total will release this week.

     

    Here is the full list of games:

    • Abo Khashem, PS4 — Digital
    • Apex Construct, PS VR — Digital
    • Armored Warfare, PS4 — Digital
    • Deadbolt, PS4, PS Vita — Digital
    • Defender’s Quest: Valley of the Forgotten DX Edition, PS4 — Digital
    • Konrad the Kitten, PS VR — Digital
    • Little Adventure on the Prairie, PS4, PS Vita — Digital
    • Metal Gear Survive, PS4 — Digital, Retail
    • Past Cure, PS4 — Digital, Retail 
    • Premium Pool Arena, PS4 — Digital
    • Rad Rodgers, PS4 — Digital, Retail
    • Restless Spirit, PS VR — Digital
    • Run Dorothy Run, PS VR — Digital
    • The Station, PS4 — Digital
    • Sword Art Online: Fatal Bullet, PS4 — Digital, Retail
    • Symmetry, PS4 — Digital
    • Tiles, PS4 — Digital
    • Xenon Valkyrie +, PS4 — Digital

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/272600/new-playstation-releases-this-week-metal-gear-survive/

  • scissors
    February 17th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    Sony Interactive Entertainment America is running a Flash Sale on the US PlayStation Store discounting games up to 70 percent off until February 19 at 8am PT.

     

    Here is the list of games discounted:

    PlatformTitleSale PriceOriginal Price
    PS4 ACTION HENK $4.49 $14.99
    PS4 AGENTS OF MAYHEM $9.99 $39.99
    PS4 AGENTS OF MAYHEM: TOTAL MAYHEM BUNDLE $12.49 $49.99
    PS4 ALEKHINE’S GUN $15.99 $39.99
    PS4 AMNESIA: COLLECTION $11.99 $29.99
    PS4 ASSASSIN’S CREED 4 BLACK FLAG GOLD EDITION $16.49 $49.99
    PS4 ASSASSIN’S CREED IV BLACK FLAG $9.89 $29.99
    PS4 BATTLEFIELD 4 PREMIUM EDITION $14.99 $59.99
    PS4 BATTLEFIELD HARDLINE ULTIMATE EDITION $14.99 $59.99
    PS4 BIG BUCK HUNTER ARCADE $7.99 $19.99
    PS4 BOUND BY FLAME $4.99 $19.99
    PS4 BUBSY: THE WOOLIES STRIKE BACK $7.99 $19.99
    PS4 CYBERDIMENSION NEPTUNIA: 4 GODDESSES ONLINE $19.99 $49.99
    PS4 DARKSIDERS: FURY’S COLLECTION – WAR AND DEATH $15.99 $39.99
    PS4 DEAD RISING $6.99 $19.99
    PS4 DEAD RISING 2 $6.99 $19.99
    PS4 DEAD RISING 2 OFF THE RECORD $6.99 $19.99
    PS4 DRAGON AGE: INQUISITION – GAME OF THE YEAR EDITION $9.99 $39.99
    PS4 DUKE NUKEM 3D: 20TH ANNIVERSARY WORLD TOUR $7.99 $19.99
    PS4 FINAL FANTASY XV $19.99 $49.99
    PS4 FINAL FANTASY XV DIGITAL PREMIUM EDITION $29.99 $74.99
    PS4 FORCED: SLIGHTLY BETTER EDITION $2.24 $14.99
    PS4 HAS BEEN HEROES $6.79 $19.99
    PS4 HUMAN FALL FLAT $5.99 $14.99
    PS4 INFAMOUS SECOND SON $7.99 $19.99
    PS4 INFAMOUS: FIRST LIGHT $5.99 $14.99
    PS4 INJUSTICE 2 – ULTIMATE EDITION $31.99 $79.99
    PS4 LEGEND OF KAY ANNIVERSARY $7.49 $29.99
    PS4 LICHDOM: BATTLEMAGE $15.99 $39.99
    PS4 MAIZE $7.99 $19.99
    PS4 MARVEL: ULTIMATE ALLIANCE $15.99 $39.99
    PS4 MARVEL: ULTIMATE ALLIANCE 2 $15.99 $39.99
    PS4 MARVEL: ULTIMATE ALLIANCE BUNDLE $23.99 $59.99
    PS4 MASS EFFECT: ANDROMEDA RECRUIT EDITION $9.89 $29.99
    PS4 MASS EFFECT: ANDROMEDA RECRUIT EDITION $13.19 $39.99
    PS4 MATTERFALL $7.99 $19.99
    PS4 METAL SLUG 3 $3.74 $14.99
    PS4 METAL SLUG ANTHOLOGY (PS2 CLASSIC) $7.99 $19.99
    PS4 METRO 2033 REDUX $7.99 $19.99
    PS4 METRO REDUX $11.99 $29.99
    PS4 METRO: LAST LIGHT REDUX $7.99 $19.99
    PS4 MIGHTY NO. 9 $7.99 $19.99
    PS4 MINECRAFT STORY MODE: SEASON 2 SEASON PASS $9.99 $24.99
    PS4 MINECRAFT: STORY MODE – ADVENTURE PASS $3.99 $9.99
    PS4 MINECRAFT: STORY MODE – SEASON PASS $7.99 $19.99
    PS4 MINECRAFT: STORY MODE – SEASON PASS DELUXE $11.99 $29.99
    PS4 MIRROR’S EDGE CATALYST $4.99 $19.99
    PS4 NEVER ALONE (KISIMA INGITCHUNA) $2.99 $14.99
    PS4 ODDWORLD: NEW N TASTY $4.99 $19.99
    PS4 OUTCAST – SECOND CONTACT $19.99 $39.99
    PS4 OUTLAST 2 $11.99 $29.99
    PS4 OUTLAST: BUNDLE OF TERROR (OUTLAST + WHISTLEBLOWER) $7.24 $28.99
    PS4 OVERWATCH – GAME OF THE YEAR BUNDLE $29.99 $59.99
    PS4 RESIDENT EVIL 6 $7.99 $19.99
    PS4 RESIDENT EVIL CODE VERONICA X (PS2) $7.49 $14.99
    PS4 RESIDENT EVIL REVELATIONS 2 – SEASON PASS $7.99 $19.99
    PS4 RESIDENT EVIL REVELATIONS 2 DELUXE EDITION $11.99 $29.99
    PS4 RISEN 3 – ENHANCED EDITION $6.99 $19.99
    PS4 ROCKET LEAGUE $11.99 $19.99
    PS4 ROCKET LEAGUE – FAST & FURIOUS DLC BUNDLE $2.99 $4.99
    PS4 ROCKET LEAGUE – GAME OF THE YEAR EDITION $14.99 $24.99
    PS4 SAINTS ROW RE-ELECTED & GAT OUT OF HELL $10.49 $29.99
    PS4 SEASONS AFTER FALL $5.99 $19.99
    PS4 SERIAL CLEANER $5.24 $14.99
    PS4 SHINESS: THE LIGHTNING KINGDOM $8.99 $29.99
    PS4 SKULLGIRLS 2ND ENCORE $9.99 $24.99
    PS4 SLAIN: BACK FROM HELL $2.99 $14.99
    PS4 SOMA $11.99 $29.99
    PS4 SONG OF THE DEEP $3.74 $14.99
    PS4 STORIES: THE PATH OF DESTINIES $3.74 $14.99
    PS4 STYX: MASTER OF SHADOWS $7.49 $29.99
    PS4 STYX: MASTER OF SHADOWS + STYX: SHARDS OF DARKNESS $14.99 $59.99
    PS4 STYX: SHARDS OF DARKNESS $12.49 $49.99
    PS4 SUPER MEAT BOY $1.49 $14.99
    PS4 TEARAWAY UNFOLDED $7.99 $19.99
    PS4 THE BOOK OF UNWRITTEN TALES 2 $3.99 $19.99
    PS4 THE FLAME IN THE FLOOD: COMPLETE EDITION $5.24 $14.99
    PS4 THE MINECRAFT: STORY MODE BUNDLE $13.99 $34.99
    PS4 THE SURGE $19.99 $49.99
    PS4 THE SURGE – COMPLETE EDITION $29.99 $59.99
    PS4 THE TECHNOMANCER $9.99 $39.99
    PS4 THE WITCH AND THE HUNDRED KNIGHT: REVIVAL EDITION $11.99 $29.99
    PS4 TITANFALL 2 – ULTIMATE EDITION 1 $9.99 $39.99
    PS4 TRANSISTOR $4.99 $19.99
    PS4 TRINE 2: COMPLETE STORY $2.99 $19.99
    PS4 TRINE 3: THE ARTIFACTS OF POWER $5.49 $21.99
    PS4 TRINE BUNDLE $7.49 $29.99
    PS4 TRINE ENCHANTED EDITION $2.24 $14.99
    PS4 TRINE TRILOGY $8.99 $29.99
    PS4 TYPOMAN $5.19 $12.99
    PS4 TYPOMAN DELUXE EDITION $6.39 $15.99
    PS4 UNCHARTED 4: A THIEF’S END $19.99 $39.99
    PS4 UNRAVEL $4.99 $19.99
    PS4 VIKINGS – WOLVES OF MIDGARD $14.99 $59.99
    PS4 WATCH DOGS $11.99 $29.99
    PS4 WATCH DOGS GOLD EDITION $16.49 $49.99
    PS4 WE ARE THE DWARVES $4.94 $14.99
    PS4 WE ARE THE DWARVES $4.94 $14.99
    PS4 ZOMBI $7.99 $19.99
    PS3 ALICE: MADNESS RETURNS $4.99 $19.99
    PS3 ALIEN RAGE $2.99 $14.99
    PS3 ASSASSIN’S CREED IV BLACK FLAG $6.59 $19.99
    PS3 ASSASSIN’S CREEDIV BLACK FLAG GOLD EDITION $13.19 $39.99
    PS3 BATTLEFIELD 4 PREMIUM EDITION $14.99 $59.99
    PS3 BATTLEFIELD HARDLINE ULTIMATE EDITION $17.49 $69.99
    PS3 BOUND BY FLAME $4.99 $19.99
    PS3 CONTRAST $2.49 $9.99
    PS3 DC UNIVERSE: DC UNIVERSE ONLINE STARTER PACK $3.19 $7.99
    PS3 DC UNIVERSE: ULTIMATE EDITION (2017) $35.99 $89.99
    PS3 DEAD SPACE 2 ULTIMATE EDITION $7.49 $29.99
    PS3 DEAD SPACE 3 ULTIMATE EDITION $7.49 $29.99
    PS3 DEAD SPACE ULTIMATE EDITION $6.24 $24.99
    PS3 DRAGON AGE II $4.99 $19.99
    PS3 DRAGON AGE: ORIGINS $4.99 $19.99
    PS3 ENEMY FRONT $5.99 $39.99
    PS3 FAIRY FENCER F $3.99 $19.99
    PS3 GRAND THEFT AUTO IV $6.99 $19.99
    PS3 GRIMGRIMOIRE (PS2 CLASSIC) $1.99 $9.99
    PS3 HEAVY FIRE BUNDLE $4.94 $14.99
    PS3 HEAVY FIRE: AFGHANISTAN $2.89 $9.99
    PS3 HEAVY FIRE: SHATTERED SPEAR $2.89 $9.99
    PS3 KURULIN FUSION $1.99 $4.99
    PS3 MASS EFFECT TRILOGY $9.89 $29.99
    PS3 MINECRAFT: STORY MODE – ADVENTURE PASS $3.99 $9.99
    PS3 MINECRAFT: STORY MODE – SEASON PASS $7.99 $19.99
    PS3 MINECRAFT: STORY MODE – SEASON PASS DELUXE $11.99 $29.99
    PS3 MIRROR’S EDGE $3.74 $14.99
    PS3 ODDWORLD: NEW N TASTY $4.99 $19.99
    PS3 PAINKILLER HELL & DAMNATION $3.99 $19.99
    PS3 R-TYPE DIMENSIONS $3.99 $9.99
    PS3 R-TYPE DIMENSIONS $3.99 $9.99
    PS3 RED DEAD REDEMPTION $9.89 $29.99
    PS3 RESIDENT EVIL 6 $6.99 $19.99
    PS3 RESIDENT EVIL 6 ULTIMATE EDITION $4.19 $27.99
    PS3 RESIDENT EVIL CHRONICLES: HD COLLECTION $5.39 $26.99
    PS3 RESIDENT EVIL CODE VERONICA X HD $4.99 $19.99
    PS3 RESIDENT EVIL REVELATIONS 2 – SEASON PASS $4.99 $19.99
    PS3 RESIDENT EVIL REVELATIONS 2 DELUXE EDITION $11.99 $29.99
    PS3 RESIDENT EVIL: THE DARKSIDE CHRONICLES $2.99 $14.99
    PS3 RESIDENT EVIL: THE UMBRELLA CHRONICLES $2.99 $14.99
    PS3 SKULLGIRLS ENCORE $2.99 $9.99
    PS3 SNIPER GHOST WARRIOR 2 $3.99 $39.99
    PS3 SNIPER GHOST WARRIOR 2 SIBERIAN STRIKE $1.99 $9.99
    PS3 SNIPER GHOST WARRIOR 2 WORLD HUNTER PACK $1.59 $3.99
    PS3 WATCH DOGS $7.99 $19.99
    PS3 WATCH DOGS GOLD EDITION $13.19 $39.99
    PS VITA ODDWORLD: NEW ‘N’ TASTY $4.99 $19.99
    PS VITA SKULLGIRLS 2ND ENCORE $9.99 $24.99
    PS VITA TEARAWAY $4.99 $19.99

     

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/272599/us-playstation-store-flash-sale-discounts-games-up-to-70-off/

  • scissors
    February 16th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

     Matt Makes Games' Celeste is a triumph, in every sense of the word. This is a truly special game that captures the true and impressionistic beauty of the old bit era and all it has to offer. Not since Yacht Club Games' Shovel Knight has this style of game been so wonderfully realized. What made Shovel Knight so good was the character movement and slow mastery (and therefore sense of accomplishment) of those movements in order to advance through the levels, and Celeste somehow manages to surpass it on these fronts. 

     
    I cannot express how important movement can be in a game and how otherwise good titles can be ruined by a lack of concern on the developer’s part for making this element enjoyable. Thankfully, Celeste is one of the most pleasant games I have experienced in this respect. It's difficult and you will die... hundreds of times (I died over 1,000 times by the time I completed it), but you respawn so quickly and the checkpoints are so frequent that you rarely get frustrated, and on the occasions you do this feeling quickly goes away when you finally break through the next checkpoint and feel an enormous sense of satisfaction.
     
    In Celeste you hop, wall jump, double jump, and bounce off of objects all the way to the end of each world in typical platforming fashion. Every world is divided into dozens of individual screens you have to get through (let's call them levels for ease of understanding). Rarely does one get through a level without dying at least once. Indeed, often times you will need to jump so far away in order to move your screen perspective (so that you can see where you need to go to next) that you'll intentionally kill yourself.
     
    Some levels have a handy little character that will let you move your camera around so that you know what to anticipate and can strategize, but for the most part you're going to just have to take the plunge. Most levels can be completed after a couple attempts, but some are really tricky; there were quite a few that killed me dozens of times before I managed to figure them out. At least in those moments I could take solace in the fact that I usually came a little closer to the end and died in Super Smash Bros. fashion, with explosions off-screen.
     
     
    Towards the end of the Celeste, just when you've finally gotten to grips with the difficult jumping system, a new type of movement will unlock and this makes the game even more enjoyable to play. It's amazing how pleasant the double jump is to use, and the fact that you unlock it with a story progression component after hours of deaths makes it all the more satisfying. You might think, as a reader not having played the game, that unlocking the second jump wouldn't be that big of a deal, but the whole game is based on pitch-perfect timing so it really is; it's like Donkey Kong on steroids in terms of jump timing.
     
    The only thing more impressive than the gameplay mechanics is the story. I have never, in the 70-80 games I’ve reviewed to-date, experienced a text-based NES/SNES bit game as incredibly emotionally moving as this one. Celeste follows the story of an anxious girl who needs a break from the real world; one who I honestly thought may have had a bipolar disorder. As a special education teacher I was impressed by the game's representation of a group of people that are hardly ever represented in art (be it movies, music, or video games).
     
     
    In order to have you fully understand the meaning of what I'm about to say I need to make it clear that I'm not often emotionally moved by video games. Certainly, I cannot remember ever having shed a tear over one. I shed tears while playing this game. It's so overwhelming to see how much despair the central character goes through; all the self-doubt, the anxiety, the pleading for help in the most desperate of ways, the giving up entirely.
     
    All of these things are accompanied by a soundtrack that perfectly - and I mean perfectly - fits the tone of those moments; I felt all of the sadness that she felt. I know quite a few people in my life that struggle with anxiety (friends and students) and to see this so convincingly shown in a game hit me hard. I myself felt depressed through certain parts, but I kept pushing on because I had a gut feeling about something.
     
    That feeling was that this game wasn’t about realizing the misery of life, but the beauty within the misery, and my gut turned out to be correct. I have no intention of ruining some of the game’s best characters and scenes with specifics, but after a long time of hiking up the mountain, and despite all of your self-doubts, eventually there is a major setback. But in that moment our protagonist finally finds her inner strength and peace, and manages to press on in what is one of the most emotionally charged scenes I have ever experienced in a video game.
     
     
    All of these scenes, from the funny ones to the dark, scary ones, to the sad ones, to the joyful ones, are connected with music the likes of which one rarely hears in a video game. I remember the first time your 'twin' appears and the dark music kicks in - soon after that my expectations for the game quickly went from "this seems like a decent enough indie game" to "oh my goodness this may be the best indie game I've ever played."
     
    Music is so very important and is often undervalued or ignored completely in reviews. I could literally listen to the soundtrack of Interstellar without hearing any of the movie's dialogue and probably be moved just as much if not more. Music is even more crucial in a game that doesn't actually have voice dialogue, and Celeste is all text all of the time, except for some strange noises the characters make as the dialogue is presented.
     
     
    Still, there are a couple flaws. If you love a challenge then this is a title for you, but each 'level' is short and is basically a checkpoint in itself. As you move off-screen into another screen (or level) your progress is saved. Towards the end of the game there are more and more checkpoints, but not because the game is divided into multiple screens, but rather a few large ones that contain very difficult jumps. Personally, I loved these checkpoints, but I understand not everyone will appreciate the change in how they're distributed towards the end.
     
    On the other hand some levels require an enormous amount of deaths before you'll figure things out - which by itself is fine - but this will sometimes be because you can't adjust the camera angle to anticipate upcoming sections, which can be incredibly frustrating and will feel a little unfair at times.
     
     
    Celeste isn't perfect, but that's fitting because the story is about an imperfect protagonist. But it's undoubtedly an incredible game; one you're unlikely to forget thanks to its heavy hitting tones and the absolute resolve of its protagonist who never gives in to the temptation of apathy and despair. 

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/272569/celeste-ns/

  • scissors
    February 16th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    What would it be like to experience a game that started you at the end boss? And what if your hero didn't even remember who they were when facing said boss? Developer Nippon Ichi Software and NIS America seek to answer these questions with this quirky retro-style RPG, The Longest Five Minutes. It's a game that takes the typical RPG formula and turns it on its head; well, in some respects anyway.

    The Longest Five Minutes is, on one level, a nostalgic homage to the 8 bit RPGs of yesteryear with its colorful pixel art and basic mechanics, yet it paradoxically adds some innovative elements that provide a breath of fresh air. Unfortunately though, the game never quite excels in either of these aspects. It offers little of substance outside its memorable narrative and interesting characters, and its basic retro aesthetic comes off more as stock than nostalgic or charming.

    As simplistic as the visuals look, the gameplay is even moreso. The Longest Five Minutes in fact goes so minimal on the gameplay side that it verges on being an interactive visual novel, albeit an decent one. The battle system is even simple enough to essentially play itself, as you can select pre-determined styles of automatic moves, emphasizing attacks, spells, or healing. Then it’s a matter of holding the “a” button during the brief, randomly generated battle as the game does its thing.

    The Longest Five Minutes is so easy that you rarely have to worry about fighting manually and implementing real strategy. As long as you grind a bit and buy a few decent upgrades to equip, it's smooth sailing, since you typically overpower your foes by a wide margin. In fact, I only died a couple of times during my entire run, one of which was a particularly difficult boss fight that I somewhat rushed to get to. There were quite a few moments like this during my playthrough in which I couldn't help but ask, “well, what’s the point?”

    To its credit, the game does provide some more appeal and depth to its story. It embraces a unique and interesting formula in terms of its narrative and progression that defies traditional linear structure. You essentially begin at the end boss - the Demon King - and play your way back in the form of a drawn-out stretch of 5 minute flashbacks. You find you have no memory of who you or your friends are, how you ended up here, or why your going blow to blow with this menacing demon. You eventually come full circle and remember the events and circumstances that led you to this climax.

    These memories take the form of a few dozen bite-sized segments which range from 5 minute fetch quests to half hour dungeon crawls, many of which contain watered-down versions of those Pokemon Gameboy puzzles. Each flashback contains a main objective and sometimes sprinkles in a couple of basic sidequests for bonus xp, reeling you back to the final boss battle upon completion. You'll occasionally be posed choices as to how you go about attacking the boss with text prompts, like a choose-your-own-adventure.

    This formula certainly makes The Longest Five Minutes an ideal fit for the on-the-go Switch player, who may only have, say, a 40 minute train ride to burn through a couple of quests and take out that miniboss atop the tower. It can also be a liberating experience to zip across completely different scenes of the game and gain power so quickly. Yet these bits of gameplay tend to feel disjointed, as they jump you around to so many different points in the story, and there isn't much that connects them. This is true in terms of progression as well - as the game resets your cash, weapons, and armor at the start of each memory. You'll find that you've often leapt 10-20 levels higher and have been granted additional spells too.

    Thus, despite the interesting plot, I struggled to be fully invested in many of my trips down memory lane, as I was essentially "fast forwarding" through my hero's experience. It’s also tough to be motivated to really deck out your character because their gear is going to be completely changed during the following memory anyway. The only real consistent element of progression is what’s referred to as “re-experience points,” which carries over from one memory to the next.

    To be fair, these odd dynamics do make sense within the context of the story - and I did enjoy the narrative overall, despite my relative indifference to game stories as a whole. There is plenty of drama, suspense, and humor throughout, along with some neat plot twists and revelations to keep you at least curious enough to press on. As you progress, you learn more and more about who you are, your true purpose, and the origin of the Demon King, along with a malevolent fog which plagues the lands and turns all in its path into demons.

    Even inanimate objects aren't safe from this fog, which makes for some amusing battles as you go head-to-head against the likes of possessed wine barrels and killer trains. As you might expect, then, the game never takes itself too seriously despite some profound and dark moments. On top of some comical baddies, our heroes speak plenty of quips and engage in whimsical exchanges you might find in your typical light-hearted anime.

    The plot certainly keeps you somewhat engaged with its likable cast of characters, and the fact that we're uncovering details right along with our protagonist allows us to connect on some level. With all this said, there is an abundance of mindless chatter among both our heroes and a majority of the NPCs that contribute little, if anything, to the plot. Even by RPG standards, the amount of pointless text can be excessive. Still, the game at least hints at some enriching world building and cool fantasy themes in the background that invoke the imagination.

    As a whole, I quite liked the The Longest Five Minutes’ themes and concepts in theory; the idea of rediscovering ones self through memories, “the past affecting the present” through in-game choices, and the dark fantasy overlay. It’s just that all this potential feels largely unrealized and hardly fleshed out in the way it could have been. There isn’t a large diversity of choices that impact play during your battle with the Demon King, or in general for that matter. There also aren't really notable instances of memories directly affecting this battle, which the game seems to imply. Still, if you're fond of oldschool 8 bit JRPGs ala Pokemon, Dragon Quest, and Earthbound, and enjoy a relatively rich story with your games, you might get more out of The Longest Five Minutes. Just don’t expect a rich and hearty RPG meal - this is more of a small platter of bite-sized appetizers.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/272582/the-longest-five-minutes-ns/

  • scissors
    February 16th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    With the holiday weekend Microsoft is running a sale on the Xbox One S in the US and Canada. 

    Xbox One S bundles in the US will be discounted by $50 from Sunday, February 18 through March 3. In Canada the 1TB Xbox One S bundles have been discounted by $60 CAD through February 23.

     

    For a limited time all Xbox One X consoles sold will come with a digital copy of PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds. This promotion is available in most markets starting February 18 and ending March 4. However, the exact dates will vary depending on the market. In the US it will run from Sunday, February 18 through February 24. 

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/272597/xbox-one-s-bundles-discounted-in-the-us-and-canada-buy-an-xbox-one-x-and-get-pubg-free/

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