XBox 360 Universe

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  • scissors
    December 10th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    Ppublisher Playdius and developer Aurelien Regard Games announced AWAY: Journey to the Unexpected will launch for the PlayStation 4 on February 5, 2019, the Nintendo Switch on February 7, the Xbox One on February 8, and Windows PC in February. 

    View the latest trailer below:


    Here is an overview of the game:

    A colorful first-person adventure game that combines action, negotiation and rogue-lite elements!

    Progress through the levels and the story, choose your path, but above all, recruit allies. All the strange characters you meet ingame can be played in first person, and it’s up to you to find the right answers to get them to join your team!

    Idiotic workmen, mystery from outer space, oddball friends, and fast combats await!

    Key Features:

    • Journey around a colorful world with unique visuals, with 2D characters living in a 3D world.
    • Unravel a funny and light-hearted story, with just the right pinch of rogue-lite elements.
    • Befriend and play a large variety of quirky characters!
    • An anime-themed soundtrack composed by Kazuhiko Naruse.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/393922/away-journey-to-the-unexpected-release-date-revealed/

  • scissors
    December 10th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    This is the fifth entry in a series of articles I’m writing that will look at all of the games available in a particular genre on the Vita. The articles will highlight all Vita-native games, as well as any backwards-compatible PSP and PS1 titles that can be downloaded in English (i.e. from the EU or NA stores), and will include some commentary on how well those games run on Vita and whether they fill any missing gaps in the library.

    While fully-fledged fighting games on handhelds have achieved varying levels of success in the past, they weren’t really a thing until the PSP. Prior to this there would always be certain concessions to get them running on weaker hardware. Sony’s powerful portable console, however, allowed developers to experiment with new ways of delivering their titles that would sometimes be hugely successful (e.g. Tekken 5: Dark Resurrection), which in turn meant new games were forthcoming throughout the console’s life. This mantra continued onto the Vita, which received ports of a number of high-profile fighting games, from launch through to the present day.

    The ever-expanding industry of eSports has somewhat put a damper on handheld fighting games, as the fanbase moves increasingly towards arcade sticks, perfect latency, and other measures that always ensure a fair fight. That doesn’t mean the Vita doesn’t have access to its fair share of fighting games, though – whether you like 3D arena brawlers, party-friendly multiplayer titles, or pixel-perfect technical 2D fighters, you’re well served by the selection that’s available here, especially when including backwards-compatible PSP & PS1 games.

     

    Vita-Native Games

    Since the genre has moved increasingly towards the competitive scene, handheld consoles rarely receive custom-built fighting games designed specifically for the hardware. The Vita was no different, mainly getting down-ports from home console games, aside from the odd anomaly like Reality Fighters that used the AR features to create a shallow gimmick.  

    Thankfully, the ports Vita got tended to be of incredible quality, holding up very well to the versions on more powerful consoles. Possibly the most notable of these was Dead or Alive 5+, an expanded release including extra content, gorgeous graphics, and smooth 60fps gameplay (making it one of the few 3D titles on the handheld to achieve this; an impressive technical achievement). It also added a fairly awful first-person mode that included touch features, but this didn’t detract from the core title being a lot of fun. 

    While it didn’t get a mainline Street Fighter or Tekken entry (the latter's omission being particularly disappointing), Vita did receive a crossover in Street Fighter x Tekken, which mashed the two franchises together using the engine from Street Fighter IV. The title received a muted critical reception upon its home console release, thanks to its DLC-heavy gems system, but the Vita version fixed a lot of this by including this content on the cart. It was also another incredibly impressive port, dropping little of the detail of its PS3 counterpart and running smoothly.

    While Capcom barely touched Sony’s handheld throughout its life, one of its major releases was another impressive fighting game port – Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3, which was a 2D crossover title featuring characters from franchises such as Mega Man and Resident Evil alongside a whole host of Marvel heroes. It was met with a large amount of critical acclaim for its skilled technical combat and brilliant transition to Vita, making it one of the console’s most essential titles. 

    Superheroes from the other end of the spectrum also received representation on Vita, namely through Injustice: Gods Among Us, which mashed together good and bad guys from DC’s universe into an enjoyable fighter. It was developed by NetherRealm Studios, who also created Mortal Kombat and ported it to Sony’s handheld. Both games are content-rich titles that offer unique fighting mechanics while targeting 60fps gameplay, although they’re also both notable for making significant graphical concessions in order to achieve that.

    Crossover fighters seemed particularly popular on Vita, as aside from Street FighterMarvel, and Injustice, Sony also tried its hand at it with PlayStation All-Stars Battle Royale, which mixed a number of characters from PlayStation history. Borrowing mechanics from Nintendo’s Super Smash Bros., it received a significant amount of internet vitriol for being too blatant a clone (even though people also complained that its ‘supers’ system wasn’t fun either), but it’s one I personally really enjoyed and I can definitely recommend checking it out (especially if you have as long a history with Sony’s machines, as I do).  

    Bandai-Namco also threw its hat into the ring using its veritable stable of anime licences with J-Stars Victory Vs.+. Bringing together heroes such as Dragon Ball’s Goku, One Piece’s Luffy, and Naruto (from, shockingly, Naruto), it brought a different dimension to the combat - namely fully explorable 3D arenas - and added some pretty lengthy RPG modes for the main cast, which mixed fighting with world-map exploration. It was certainly ambitious but suffered from repetitive content and this let the whole package down 

    Indeed, the 3D anime arena fighter became something Bandai-Namco would specialise in on Vita, as the company also released games that focused on just one of the J-Stars series. For example, Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Z was an Artdink-developed take on DBZ’s famous over-the-top combat, while One Piece: Burning Blood featured the straw hat gang brawling it out using the engine from J-Stars. Sadly, the Vita never received a native Naruto title though. Neither of the aforementioned titles were particularly amazing, a sentiment I shared when I reviewed the Japan-only Irregular at Magic High School: Out of Order, which was a short and forgettable title for fans of the series only.

    Something else that has become popular in recent years is the 3D mech fighter, and again Vita received representation in this regard with Mobile Suit Gundam: Extreme Vs Force. While reviewers lambasted it for lacking content compared to its PS3 counterparts, I thought it was a lot of fun. The Extreme Vs series success likely led to SEGA reviving its Virtual-On franchise too, with 2018’s A Certain Magical Virtual-On, which became one of the most flashy and enjoyable fighters on the handheld (even if you have to import a Japanese copy to play it).

    SEGA also tried its hand at a 2D crossover fighter in Dengeki Bunko: Fighting Climax (and its Japan-only expansion Ignition), which threw together characters from various Dengeki series like Accel World and Sword Art Online. In the arena of 2D fighters it’s difficult not to mention Arc System Works, though, whose flagship franchise Blazblue saw three entries from the console’s launch (Continuum Shift Extend) to 2015 (Chronophantasma Extend), each one fine-tuning the carefully balanced fighting gameplay the series was known for and which never failed to impress reviewers 

    This wouldn’t be all that Arc System Works would offer on Vita – the company also published the Examu-developed girls-only title Arcana Heart 3: Love Max, as well as Guilty Gear XX Accent Core Plus R (the most content-complete version of its original fighting game franchise). Even as late as 2018 Arc System Works  released Under Night In-birth Exe:Late[st], meaning if you’re a fan of the company’s technical-heavy gameplay you’d be well served on Sony’s handheld.  

    If you prefer your 2D fighters a bit more retro, you’d do well to check out any of SNK’s titles. The stand-out for me is Garou: Mark of the Wolves, an immensely enjoyable entry in the Fatal Fury series, featuring some of the most gorgeous sprite work I’ve come across. There’s also King of Fighters ’97: Global Match, or if you prefer weapons-based combat you could check out The Last Blade 2 (a long forgotten classic), or Samurai Shodown V Special, which is available on Vita in its full uncensored form 

    The majority of the titles in this article so far have been Japanese-developed, but the western indie scene has gotten in on the action too. Most notable is Skullgirls: 2nd Encore, an expansive 2D fighter that even received a physical release through Limited Run Games, owing to its large popularity. There’s also the bonkers Nidhogg, as well as the two-button classic Divekick, and it seems there’s even more to come in future, with Battle Rockets targeting a 2019 release on Sony’s handheld.  

    As a final note, the Japanese indie scene did also somewhat target the Vita, with games like Touhou Sky Arena coming to the platform in Japan (and others such as Touhou Kobuto V: Burst Battle even making it to the west). They may not have been the best games, but they’re there if you want them!  

     

    Backwards-Compatible PSP Games

    The PSP received a similar level of fighting game support as Vita, likely owing to their comparable abilities in emulating a home console just with lower specs. The key difference for me was some of the major franchises that showed their faces on PSP – the main one being Tekken with Tekken 6. 

    A ‘full fat’ port with all the characters and features in tact, it was an immensely impressive release on PSP that remains just as spectacular on Vita and runs at a fluid 60fps. It’s just a shame Tekken 5: Dark Resurrection is only available on the Japanese PSN, although it is fully playable in English. Namco would also release SoulCalibur: Broken Destiny on PSP - the game condensed the weapons-based fighting down for portable sessions but still remained an enjoyable title, not least thanks to its stunning graphics. 

    Another game that was successfully transported down to the PSP was Mortal Kombat Unchained, an expanded version of 2004’s Deception, which saw the gameplay shift to a 3D perspective but maintain the ultra-violent fatalities the series was known for. For Vita, it’s sadly only available from the North American PlayStation store, something which also affects street brawlers The Con and Def Jam Fight for NY: The Takeover, as well as SNK compilation titles The King of Fighters Collection and Samurai Shodown Anthology. 

    Another compilation that hit PSP (and is only available in the NA store) is Darkstalkers Chronicle: The Chaos Tower, which mixes elements from each of the first three entries in the series (it’s worth noting the first and third entries are also available as PS1 Classics). Aside from this Capcom wasn’t especially forthcoming with its fighters on the PSP, aside from the expanded port Street Fighter Alpha 3 Max, although you can grab Street Fighter II through the Capcom Classics Collection, something SEGA similarly offered with Virtua Fighter 2 on the SEGA Mega Drive Collection. 

    Probably the biggest fighting game experiment on PSP was Dissidia Final Fantasy from Square-Enix (plus its prequel-sequel Dissidia 012), which mashed together a representative from every mainline Final Fantasy title up until that point into an ambitious 3D brawler. The first was a big success in both sales and critical acclaim (012 less so, although I’d recommend it as the more complete package) and would go on to spawn a PS4 sequel years later, showing it was definitely a successful experiment. If you’re looking for a title with similarly unique gameplay, you could also give the Power Stone Collection a try, a holdover from the ill-fated Dreamcast.

    Elsewhere, you can grab the Blazblue prequel Calamity Trigger Portable from the store (and oddly Continuum Shift II too), as well as another of Arc System Works' earlier releases in Guilty Gear XX Accent Core Plus (but why would you, when the Vita version has more content?).

     

    Backwards-Compatible PS1 Games

    The PS1 arguably birthed the widespread popularity of the 3D fighting game, so it’s no surprise that a number of these classics made their way to PSN.

    The most well-known series of the time was definitely Tekken and both the first game and its sequel Tekken 2 are available through the PlayStation Store. The first has aged pretty poorly but the second remains a classic that’s still fun to this day. It’s a massive shame though that the best of the bunch, Tekken 3, isn’t available (licencing issues with Gon were raised as a potential issue, but that didn’t stop it appearing on the recently-released PS Classic). 

    Other early trailblazing series such as Battle Arena ToshindenBushido Blade and Zero Divide aren’t available on the European and North American stores, but can be grabbed from Japan’s store and be played in English. Still, there are alternatives available through PS1 classics, such as Capcom’s Street Fighter Alpha and its two sequels, which carried on the popular gameplay template of Street Fighter II and made it even better. 

    A smattering of other offerings are available, from things like King of Fighters ’99 to niche forgotten series like Cyberbots: Full Metal Madness. You can also grab the original Guilty Gear, the PS1 port of Double Dragon (which was a fighting game rather than a side-scrolling brawler). and Koei’s bizarre magic-chucking title Destrega, which is worth playing just because it’s unlike anything else on the market.  

     

    Conclusion

    While it’s difficult to deny that fighting games are likely better played on home consoles where local multiplayer thrives and wi-fi connections are better, it’s also difficult to deny that the selection of games available on Vita is impressive for anyone who wants to take the fight with them on the go. Fantastic ports of things like Dead or AliveInjustice, and Street Fighter x Tekken are essential purchases for anyone with a passing interest in the genre and many of the all-time classics are here too such as Garou and King of Fighters.

    With the addition of PSP & PS1 titles, the Vita’s library expands even more drastically. Some of the most well-respected series out there – things like SoulCaliburStreet Fighter, and Tekken - have some amazing portable entries, and old favourites like Guilty Gear and Mortal Kombat surface too, all of which play extremely well with Vita’s ergonomic d-pad.

    While the selection of games is impressive in itself, when combined with the Vita’s d-pad (which feels custom-built for fighting games) there’s something really special here; something that few other handheld consoles have been able to offer.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/393921/a-look-at-all-of-the-fighting-games-available-on-vita/

  • scissors
    December 9th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    The Wonder Boy renaissance continues with Monster Boy and the Cursed Kingdom. After two remakes—Wonder Boy Returns in 2016 and Wonder Boy: The Dragon's Trap in 2017—the Sega Master System/Genesis franchise is back again with a brand new installment. Well, sort of. Monster Boy is a spiritual successor, not a licensed sequel (although series creator Ryuichi Nishizawa assisted Game Atelier in development). No matter its unofficial status, Monster Boy is a terrific game, a worthy homage to Sega's underrated action-platformer series, and an outstanding example of a modern Metroidvania.

    The game follows a young man named Jin whose uncle, drunk on royal nectar, uses his magic wand to transform all the denizens of Monster World into animal forms. Jin, transmogrified into a piratey pig, travels to the capital where he takes on a grand quest: find five magical orbs to break the magical curse.

    Monster Boy is a 2D side-scrolling action-adventure game, built around animal transformations. Whereas in most Metroidvania titles characters enter previously gated areas after unlocking a weapon or discovering a power-up, in Monster Boy, as in Wonder Boy III: The Dragon's Trap, Jin deploys a unique animal from—accessible from a pie menu by pressing ZL or ZR—to open doors, break barriers, and cross uncrossable gaps. His pig form, for example, can sniff out secret areas and perform a ground pound; his snake form, unlocked early in the game, slithers up slippery walls; his frog form breathes underwater without a fuss and deploys a long, sticky tongue to grab rings suspended in air; and so on.

    While swapping among animal incarnations can be tedious, the clever puzzle-solving, platforming, and exploration opportunities afforded by Monster Boy's signature mechanic are entirely worth it. Take one example, about 40 percent into the game. Jin enters a sacred chapel, where he must take the following steps to lower a ladder to the steeple: transform into a snake to climb an ivy-covered wall and then drop light fixtures from the ceiling; take the form of a frog to pull the fixtures closer to the ground with his tongue; and finally switch over to his porcine personification to hurl a fireball at the candles, lighting them. The game's 15-hour runtime (longer if you seek out every hidden golden armor piece, upgrade gem, and music sheet) is filled with episodes like this. You'll be adventuring back and forth across Monster World, up waterfalls, under hills, and across poisonous lakes, using specialized skills to find hidden treasure. There's an incredible thrill of discovery throughout.

    When weapons, equipment, and enemies enter the equation, things get even more challenging and gratifying. At certain story intervals, Jin receives powerful items—ice boots, a mirror shield, etc.—that allow him to defeat monsters, reach far-flung areas, and solve environmental puzzles. Players can add to his armament collection by purchasing complementary pieces in weapon and armor shops, and enhance those pieces at forges by spending collectible gems. Enhance every item in a five-piece set to earn a special set bonus.

    Many of these elements converge in Monster Boy's platforming segments, which can be surprisingly difficult and even fussy at times. In a volcano dungeon, the game's longest and most complex, players must equip ice boots to walk atop flaming enemies, transform into the lion to charge across collapsing platforms, and even transform mid-jump to avoid a sea of lava or a bed of spikes. You really must think on your feet (and off your feet) to make it through Monster World. Although Game Atelier throws a lot of curve balls at the player—and even a troll job worthy of Hideo Kojima in a late-game haunted mansion—the studio walks, for the most part, a fine line between inventive, surprising platforming and trial-and-error gameplay.

    Combat in Monster Boy is decidedly less interesting than its collage of puzzles, platforming challenges, and secret areas. It doesn't compare favorably to the Souls-like skirmishes in Dead Cells or the luchador brawling of Gucamelee! 2—even though it's a better overall package than either of those titles. In Monster Boy it's straightforward, serviceable action-platforming fighting. That said, special weapons like spears and poison daggers and unique animal attacks do spice things up a bit. Anyway, boss battles tend to be far more engaging than fights with slimes, mushrooms, and ghosts. Many are clever, different encounters that demand brawn and brain-power. One confrontation involves destroying a giant poisonous frog from the inside, another sees Jin and a sidekick tag-team a shielded undead wizard, and one other takes place at the culmination of a 2D side-scrolling shooting segment.

    This horizontally-scrolling episode is just one of many unique events in Monster Boy that make it one of the more dynamic and memorable games of the year. There's an Indiana Jones-esque escape from an unstoppable rolling boulder, a vertical climb above a pool of rising lava, and a race against a fleet-footed scalawag, among several more.

    Monster Boy's graphics and audio are as extraordinary as its world design and action-adventure gameplay. Midway through development, Game Atelier moved from sprites to hand-drawn animation, and the results are spectacular. Character models are energetic and flowing, backgrounds are deep and detailed—there are a few areas where Jin can actually leap into the background to open a treasure chest—and the entire storybook world is bouncing and alive. The game's opening cinematic is glorious also. Music, composed by industry veterans Motoi Sakuraba, Michiru Yamane, and Yuzo Koshiro, among others, is catchy and bright.

    It might not be an official sequel, but Monster Boy is an excellent heir to the Wonder Boy brand. With clever platforming, an engaging action-adventure formula, memorable special encounters, and an enchanting, vibrant world, it's a late contender for game-of-the-year. Some punishing platform segments and straightforward combat are small warts on a terrific, substantial, imaginative package.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/393742/monster-boy-and-the-cursed-kingdom-ns/

  • scissors
    December 9th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    The Wonder Boy renaissance continues with Monster Boy and the Cursed Kingdom. After two remakes—Wonder Boy Returns in 2016 and Wonder Boy: The Dragon's Trap in 2017—the Sega Master System/Genesis franchise is back again with a brand new installment. Well, sort of. Monster Boy is a spiritual successor, not a licensed sequel (although series creator Ryuichi Nishizawa assisted Game Atelier in development). No matter its unofficial status, Monster Boy is a terrific game, a worthy homage to Sega's underrated action-platformer series, and an outstanding example of a modern Metroidvania.

    The game follows a young man named Jin whose uncle, drunk on royal nectar, uses his magic wand to transform all the denizens of Monster World into animal forms. Jin, transmogrified into a piratey pig, travels to the capital where he takes on a grand quest: find five magical orbs to break the magical curse.

    Monster Boy is a 2D side-scrolling action-adventure game, built around animal transformations. Whereas in most Metroidvania titles characters enter previously gated areas after unlocking a weapon or discovering a power-up, in Monster Boy, as in Wonder Boy III: The Dragon's Trap, Jin deploys a unique animal from—accessible from a pie menu by pressing ZL or ZR—to open doors, break barriers, and cross uncrossable gaps. His pig form, for example, can sniff out secret areas and perform a ground pound; his snake form, unlocked early in the game, slithers up slippery walls; his frog form breathes underwater without a fuss and deploys a long, sticky tongue to grab rings suspended in air; and so on.

    While swapping among animal incarnations can be tedious, the clever puzzle-solving, platforming, and exploration opportunities afforded by Monster Boy's signature mechanic are entirely worth it. Take one example, about 40 percent into the game. Jin enters a sacred chapel, where he must take the following steps to lower a ladder to the steeple: transform into a snake to climb an ivy-covered wall and then drop light fixtures from the ceiling; take the form of a frog to pull the fixtures closer to the ground with his tongue; and finally switch over to his porcine personification to hurl a fireball at the candles, lighting them. The game's 15-hour runtime (longer if you seek out every hidden golden armor piece, upgrade gem, and music sheet) is filled with episodes like this. You'll be adventuring back and forth across Monster World, up waterfalls, under hills, and across poisonous lakes, using specialized skills to find hidden treasure. There's an incredible thrill of discovery throughout.

    When weapons, equipment, and enemies enter the equation, things get even more challenging and gratifying. At certain story intervals, Jin receives powerful items—ice boots, a mirror shield, etc.—that allow him to defeat monsters, reach far-flung areas, and solve environmental puzzles. Players can add to his armament collection by purchasing complementary pieces in weapon and armor shops, and enhance those pieces at forges by spending collectible gems. Enhance every item in a five-piece set to earn a special set bonus.

    Many of these elements converge in Monster Boy's platforming segments, which can be surprisingly difficult and even fussy at times. In a volcano dungeon, the game's longest and most complex, players must equip ice boots to walk atop flaming enemies, transform into the lion to charge across collapsing platforms, and even transform mid-jump to avoid a sea of lava or a bed of spikes. You really must think on your feet (and off your feet) to make it through Monster World. Although Game Atelier throws a lot of curve balls at the player—and even a troll job worthy of Hideo Kojima in a late-game haunted mansion—the studio walks, for the most part, a fine line between inventive, surprising platforming and trial-and-error gameplay.

    Combat in Monster Boy is decidedly less interesting than its collage of puzzles, platforming challenges, and secret areas. It doesn't compare favorably to the Souls-like skirmishes in Dead Cells or the luchador brawling of Gucamelee! 2—even though it's a better overall package than either of those titles. In Monster Boy it's straightforward, serviceable action-platforming fighting. That said, special weapons like spears and poison daggers and unique animal attacks do spice things up a bit. Anyway, boss battles tend to be far more engaging than fights with slimes, mushrooms, and ghosts. Many are clever, different encounters that demand brawn and brain-power. One confrontation involves destroying a giant poisonous frog from the inside, another sees Jin and a sidekick tag-team a shielded undead wizard, and one other takes place at the culmination of a 2D side-scrolling shooting segment.

    This horizontally-scrolling episode is just one of many unique events in Monster Boy that make it one of the more dynamic and memorable games of the year. There's an Indiana Jones-esque escape from an unstoppable rolling boulder, a vertical climb above a pool of rising lava, and a race against a fleet-footed scalawag, among several more.

    Monster Boy's graphics and audio are as extraordinary as its world design and action-adventure gameplay. Midway through development, Game Atelier moved from sprites to hand-drawn animation, and the results are spectacular. Character models are energetic and flowing, backgrounds are deep and detailed—there are a few areas where Jin can actually leap into the background to open a treasure chest—and the entire storybook world is bouncing and alive. The game's opening cinematic is glorious also. Music, composed by industry veterans Motoi Sakuraba, Michiru Yamane, and Yuzo Koshiro, among others, is catchy and bright.

    It might not be an official sequel, but Monster Boy is an excellent heir to the Wonder Boy brand. With clever platforming, an engaging action-adventure formula, memorable special encounters, and an enchanting, vibrant world, it's a late contender for game-of-the-year. Some punishing platform segments and straightforward combat are small warts on a terrific, substantial, imaginative package.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/393742/monster-boy-and-the-cursed-kingdom-ns/

  • scissors
    December 8th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    The PlayStation 4 has outsold the lifetime sales of the Xbox 360, according to our estimates.

    The PlayStation 4 sold 533,999 units for the week ending November 17, 2018 to bring its lifetime sales to 86.15 million units. This compares to the Xbox 360 with sales of 85.80 million units. 

     

    Breaking down PlayStation 4 sales by region, it has sold 34.77 million units in Europe, 26.33 million units in the US and 7.21 million units in Japan. The Xbox 360 sold 45.14 million units in the US, 25.87 million units in Europe and 1.67 million units in Japan.

    Breaking down sales in Europe even further, the PlayStation 4 has sold 5.60 million units in the UK, 6.01 million units in Germany and 4.77 million units in France. The Xbox 360 sold 9.14 million units in the UK, 2.67 million units in Germany and 3.58 million units in France.

    The best-selling PlayStation 4 game is Grand Theft Auto V with 18.77 million units sold to date and climbing, while Kinect Adventures was the best-selling Xbox 360 game with 22.10 million units sold. However, the best-selling non-bundled Xbox 360 games is Grand Theft Auto V with 15.86 million units sold.

    Uncharted 4: A Thief's End is the best-selling first-party games on the PlayStation 4 with 10.16 million units sold.

     

    Here is the list of the top 10 best-selling PlayStation 4 games as of October 27, 2018:

    PosGameYearGenrePublisherNorth AmericaEuropeJapanRest of WorldGlobal
    1. Grand Theft Auto V 2014 Action Rockstar Games 5.84 9.41 0.60 2.92 18.77
    2. Call of Duty: Black Ops 3 2015 Shooter Activision 6.14 6.05 0.41 2.43 15.03
    3. Call of Duty: WWII 2017 Shooter Activision 4.60 6.11 0.40 2.09 13.20
    4. FIFA 18 2017 Sports EA Sports 1.25 8.62 0.15 1.72 11.74
    5. FIFA 17 2016 Sports Electronic Arts 1.25 7.95 0.12 1.61 10.94
    6. Uncharted (PS4) 2016 Action Sony Interactive Entertainment 4.40 3.88 0.21 1.67 10.16
    7. Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare 2016 Shooter Activision 3.05 3.82 0.19 1.35 8.41
    8. Fallout 4 2015 Role-Playing Bethesda Softworks 2.84 3.94 0.27 1.32 8.37
    9. FIFA 16 2015 Sports EA Sports 1.15 5.77 0.07 1.23 8.22
    10. Star Wars Battlefront (2015) 2015 Shooter Electronic Arts 3.30 3.19 0.23 1.30 8.02

     

    Here is the list of the top 10 best-selling Xbox 360 games:

    PosGameYearGenrePublisherNorth AmericaEuropeJapanRest of WorldGlobal
    1. Kinect Adventures 2010 Party Microsoft Game Studios 15.09 4.97 0.24 1.81 22.10
    2. Grand Theft Auto V 2013 Action Rockstar Games 9.06 5.33 0.06 1.41 15.86
    3. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 2011 Shooter Activision 9.07 4.29 0.13 1.33 14.82
    4. Call of Duty: Black Ops 2010 Shooter Activision 9.76 3.73 0.11 1.14 14.74
    5. Call of Duty: Black Ops II 2012 Shooter Activision 8.27 4.32 0.07 1.20 13.86
    6. Call of Duty 6 2009 Shooter Activision 8.53 3.63 0.08 1.28 13.53
    7. Halo 3 2007 Shooter Microsoft Game Studios 7.97 2.81 0.13 1.21 12.13
    8. Grand Theft Auto IV 2008 Action Rockstar Games 6.80 3.11 0.14 1.04 11.09
    9. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 4 (Working Title) 2013 Shooter Activision 6.76 2.64 0.04 0.98 10.41
    10. Halo Reach 2010 Shooter Microsoft Game Studios 7.08 2.01 0.08 0.80 9.97

     

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/393909/playstation-4-outsells-the-xbox-360/

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    December 8th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    Publisher Skybound Games announced episode three of The Walking Dead: The Telltale Series – The Final Season will launch on January 15, 2019 for the Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Windows.

    View the latest trailer below:


    Here is an overview of the episode:

    After years on the road facing threats both living and dead, a secluded school might finally be Clementine’s chance for a home. But protecting it will mean sacrifice. In this gripping, emotional final season, your choices will define your relationships and determine how Clementine’s story ends.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/393920/the-walking-dead-the-final-season-episode-3-release-date-revealed/

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    December 8th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    SEGA announced Project Judge has been renamed Judgment and will launch for the PlayStation 4 in North America and Europe in summer 2019. It will also launch in Japan on Thursday December 13. 

    View the announcement trailer below:


    Here is an overview of the game:

    Judgment marks the first time in over 12 years that a game set in the Yakuza series universe has received an English dub for its Western release, the last one being the original Yakuza for the PlayStation 2 in 2006. As a result, some extra work was put in to make Judgment‘s English dub a little more complex than most. We wanted to make sure that we preserve the original Japanese script of Judgment as faithfully as possible. Here’s a breakdown of Judgment‘s dub / subtitle features:

    • Dual Audio: Players can switch between the Japanese and English voice-over tracks at any point during the game. Experience Judgment using whichever language you prefer!
    • Dual Subtitles: Subtitles change based on which audio track is selected – Japanese or English. Japanese voice subtitles are presented in a way that represents the traditional Yakuza experience while English voice subtitles match the English script.
    • Localization Pedigree: Judgment’s localization has been handled in-house by SEGA of America’s talented Yakuza series localization team.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/393919/project-judge-renamed-judgment-headed-west-in-summer-2019/

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    December 8th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    Publisher Funcom and developer Petroglyph have announced RTS, Conan Unconquered, for Windows PC via Steam. It will launch in Q2 2019.

    View the announcement trailer below:


    Here is an overview of the game:

    From the Star Wars: Empire at War and Command & Conquer veterans at Petroglyph comes the first-ever strategy game set in the barbaric world of Conan the Barbarian.

    Conan Unconquered is a strategy game set in the barbaric world of Conan the Barbarian where you must build your stronghold and assemble an unconquerable army to survive the savage hordes of Hyboria. Wave after wave of increasingly more difficult enemies will rush at your gates and you will need to manage resources, research new technologies to advance your defenses, and recruit an ever-growing army if you are to save survive utter destruction.

    You can choose to play the game entirely alone in single-player, but Conan Unconquered can also be enjoyed in full two-player co-op allowing for a truly unique, shared multiplayer experience. Players share a base, but both can freely construct new buildings and amass an army to reach their common goal.

    Similar to games such as They Are Billions, the enemy hordes will keep coming at you and how long you can resist the invasion depends entirely on your ability to build your stronghold and lead your army. Gameplay is real-time, but you can also pause at any time to issue commands and start construction of new buildings. Battles will be bloody and savage with players having to deal with anything from fires raging through their stronghold to piles of corpses spreading death and disease.

    The savage horde is at your gates. Will you fall or will you remain unconquered?

    Key Features:

    • Stand Against the Horde – Battle wave after wave of increasingly more difficult enemies coming to destroy your stronghold, from lowly footmen to experienced elites and mighty siege weapons. Giant snakes and scorpions, spearmen, necromancers, and flying demons will arrive in vast numbers to see your home burn to the ground.
    • Build an Unconquerable Stronghold – Manage resources such as food, gold, wood, and iron to fuel your expanding stronghold. Construct a variety of different buildings from housing to temples and military barracks. Build defensive walls around your stronghold and equip them with traps such as oil cauldrons to keep attackers at bay.
    • Two-Player Co-Op Multiplayer – Play together online and build a shared stronghold while fending off the enemy hordes. Both players can build structures freely, and research upgrades, walls, and structures are all shared allowing for a truly unique and cooperative multiplayer experience.
    • Unlock Legendary Heroes – Heroes are incredibly powerful units that can greatly influence the outcome of battles. These heroes, including Conan himself, possess special abilities and you can equip them with unique artifacts that you find as you explore the world.
    • Assemble an Unconquerable Army – You may start out with only a few foot soldiers, but before long you will have amassed an epic army of heavy cavalry, sorcerers, and more, ready at your command. Train units and keep them fed and paid to see their power grow and become truly unconquerable.
    • Survive Disease, Fire, and Death – The world of Conan the Barbarian is one of blood, battle, and savagery. As your soldiers and those of your enemy die on the battlefield, their bodies will be left to rot and spread disease that can quickly turn the tide of war. Of course, a necromancer might be able to turn that to their advantage.
    • Explore the Environment – Randomly generated maps allow for infinite re-playability and each map holds vast opportunities for players that dare to explore beyond their stronghold. Discover ruins hiding great treasures, but beware: these are often protected by massive guardians that you need to bring down to claim your loot.
    • Call Upon the Gods – Build a temple and dedicate your stronghold to Mitra. Summon their massive avatar that towers above the battlefield and crushes your enemies in its footsteps.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/393918/rts-conan-unconquered-announced-for-steam/

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    December 8th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    Publisher NIS America announced Danganronpa Trilogy will launch for the PlayStation 4 at retail on March 26, 2019 in North America, March 29 in Europe, and April 5 in Australia and New Zealand.

    Danganronpa Trilogy includes Danganronpa: Trigger Happy HavocDanganronpa 2: Goodbye Despair, and Danganronpa V3: Killing Harmony.

    Here is an overview of each title:

    Danganronpa: Trigger Happy Havoc:

    Enter Hope’s Peak Academy, a prestigious high school reserved for the nation’s “ultimate” students. Things take a twisted turn when Monokuma, a maniacal bear, takes them all prisoner in his deadly game of despair.

    Danganronpa 2: Goodbye Despair:

    With a brand new cast of Ultimates mysteriously trapped on Jabberwock Island in their own life-or-death game, having fun in the sun with this twisted teddy requires more than just a bit of wit to survive.

    Danganronpa V3: Killing Harmony:

    Set in a “psycho-cool” environment, a new cast of 16 characters find themselves kidnapped and imprisoned in a school. Inside, some will kill, some will die, and some will be punished. Reimagine what you thought high-stake, fast-paced investigation was as you investigate twisted murder cases, and condemn your new friends to death.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/393917/danganronpa-trilogy-headed-to-ps4/

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    December 8th, 2018GamespotUncategorized

    Developer Bithell Games announced Quarantine Circular is available now for the Nintendo Switch via the eShop.

    View the announcement trailer below:


    Here is an overview of the game:

    A group of scientists interrogate an alien discovered at the heart of a global pandemic. Work with your team, make decisions and uncover the alien’s true intentions.

    Inspired by classic adventure games and modern dialogue systems, Bithell Games has created another single session story which respects your time and your intelligence.

    Key Features:

    • A one-sitting game for adults in search of a polished new world to discover.
    • Developed by the award-winning team behind Thomas Was Alone and Subsurface Circular.
    • Social dynamics and greater choice enhance this twist on classic text-based adventures.
    • Responsive soundtrack by Dan Le Sac.
    • Art Gallery showcasing the development of this new story.
    • Unlockable ‘Mr Commentary’, our next generation take on a developer’s commentary.

    A life-long and avid gamer, William D'Angelo was first introduced to VGChartz in 2007. After years of supporting the site, he was brought on in 2010 as a junior analyst, working his way up to lead analyst in 2012. He has expanded his involvement in the gaming community by producing content on his own YouTube channel and Twitch channel dedicated to gaming Let's Plays and tutorials. You can contact the author at wdangelo@vgchartz.com or on Twitter @TrunksWD.

    Full Article - http://www.vgchartz.com/article/393916/quarantine-circular-out-now-on-switch/

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